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Evaluation of a faecal dysbiosis test for irritable bowel syndrome in subjects with and without obesity

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@article{73fc2747882c4bf4816848f6fae78dcd,
title = "Evaluation of a faecal dysbiosis test for irritable bowel syndrome in subjects with and without obesity",
abstract = "Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are demanded. An altered faecal microbiome has been reported in subjects with IBS and could be a valuable biomarker. This study evaluated the diagnostic properties of a new test for faecal dysbiosis, designed to distinguish IBS from healthy volunteers and compared the prevalence rates of dysbiosis related to IBS and morbid obesity. Subjects with and without morbid obesity and IBS were included. The faecal microbiota was assessed with GA-mapTM Dysbiosis Test (Genetic Analysis AS, Oslo, Norway). The test result was given as dysbiosis (yes/no). Comparisons were made between four groups: subjects with IBS and morbid obesity (IBS+/MO+); subjects without IBS and with morbid obesity (IBS-/MO+); subjects with IBS and without morbid obesity (IBS+/MO-); and healthy volunteers (IBS-/MO-).The prevalence rates of dysbiosis in the groups IBS+/MO+, IBS-/MO+, IBS+/MO- and IBS-/MO- were 18/28 (64%), 45/71 (63%), 31/63 (49%) and 38/91 (42%). Dysbiosis was more prevalent in subjects with morbid obesity, both in those with and without IBS, than in healthy volunteers (p values .04 and .006). Used as a diagnostic test for IBS in subjects without morbid obesity, the positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) were 1.18 (0.83-1.67) and 0.87 (0.65-1.18), respectively, and in subjects with morbid obesity the LR were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.73-1.41) and 0.98 (0.54-1.75) respectively. The dysbiosis test was unsuitable as a diagnostic test for IBS. Dysbiosis was statistically significantly associated with morbid obesity, but not with IBS.",
keywords = "Adult, Dysbiosis/complications, Feces/microbiology, Female, Humans, Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/complications, Prevalence",
author = "Martin Aasbrenn and J{\o}rgen Valeur and Farup, {Per G}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/00365513.2017.1419372",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "109--113",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation",
issn = "0036-5513",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of a faecal dysbiosis test for irritable bowel syndrome in subjects with and without obesity

AU - Aasbrenn, Martin

AU - Valeur, Jørgen

AU - Farup, Per G

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are demanded. An altered faecal microbiome has been reported in subjects with IBS and could be a valuable biomarker. This study evaluated the diagnostic properties of a new test for faecal dysbiosis, designed to distinguish IBS from healthy volunteers and compared the prevalence rates of dysbiosis related to IBS and morbid obesity. Subjects with and without morbid obesity and IBS were included. The faecal microbiota was assessed with GA-mapTM Dysbiosis Test (Genetic Analysis AS, Oslo, Norway). The test result was given as dysbiosis (yes/no). Comparisons were made between four groups: subjects with IBS and morbid obesity (IBS+/MO+); subjects without IBS and with morbid obesity (IBS-/MO+); subjects with IBS and without morbid obesity (IBS+/MO-); and healthy volunteers (IBS-/MO-).The prevalence rates of dysbiosis in the groups IBS+/MO+, IBS-/MO+, IBS+/MO- and IBS-/MO- were 18/28 (64%), 45/71 (63%), 31/63 (49%) and 38/91 (42%). Dysbiosis was more prevalent in subjects with morbid obesity, both in those with and without IBS, than in healthy volunteers (p values .04 and .006). Used as a diagnostic test for IBS in subjects without morbid obesity, the positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) were 1.18 (0.83-1.67) and 0.87 (0.65-1.18), respectively, and in subjects with morbid obesity the LR were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.73-1.41) and 0.98 (0.54-1.75) respectively. The dysbiosis test was unsuitable as a diagnostic test for IBS. Dysbiosis was statistically significantly associated with morbid obesity, but not with IBS.

AB - Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are demanded. An altered faecal microbiome has been reported in subjects with IBS and could be a valuable biomarker. This study evaluated the diagnostic properties of a new test for faecal dysbiosis, designed to distinguish IBS from healthy volunteers and compared the prevalence rates of dysbiosis related to IBS and morbid obesity. Subjects with and without morbid obesity and IBS were included. The faecal microbiota was assessed with GA-mapTM Dysbiosis Test (Genetic Analysis AS, Oslo, Norway). The test result was given as dysbiosis (yes/no). Comparisons were made between four groups: subjects with IBS and morbid obesity (IBS+/MO+); subjects without IBS and with morbid obesity (IBS-/MO+); subjects with IBS and without morbid obesity (IBS+/MO-); and healthy volunteers (IBS-/MO-).The prevalence rates of dysbiosis in the groups IBS+/MO+, IBS-/MO+, IBS+/MO- and IBS-/MO- were 18/28 (64%), 45/71 (63%), 31/63 (49%) and 38/91 (42%). Dysbiosis was more prevalent in subjects with morbid obesity, both in those with and without IBS, than in healthy volunteers (p values .04 and .006). Used as a diagnostic test for IBS in subjects without morbid obesity, the positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) were 1.18 (0.83-1.67) and 0.87 (0.65-1.18), respectively, and in subjects with morbid obesity the LR were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.73-1.41) and 0.98 (0.54-1.75) respectively. The dysbiosis test was unsuitable as a diagnostic test for IBS. Dysbiosis was statistically significantly associated with morbid obesity, but not with IBS.

KW - Adult

KW - Dysbiosis/complications

KW - Feces/microbiology

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obesity/complications

KW - Prevalence

U2 - 10.1080/00365513.2017.1419372

DO - 10.1080/00365513.2017.1419372

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29271246

VL - 78

SP - 109

EP - 113

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation

SN - 0036-5513

IS - 1-2

ER -

ID: 56705258