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Episodic and Chronic Cluster Headache: Differences in Family History, Traumatic Head Injury, and Chronorisk

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@article{25a330bca7444eccb6a554f4724fa0a0,
title = "Episodic and Chronic Cluster Headache: Differences in Family History, Traumatic Head Injury, and Chronorisk",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND: The diagnostic criteria of episodic and chronic cluster headache (cCH) were recently modified, yet pathophysiological differences between the two are still unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to identify and characterize other differences between episodic and cCH.METHODS: Data from a retrospective, questionnaire- and interview-based study were analyzed with a focus on associated factors including traumatic head injury (THI), familial history, and change of phenotype. Attack patterns were analyzed using Gaussian and spectral modeling.RESULTS: 400 patients and 200 controls participated. A positive family history was more prevalent in chronic than episodic cluster headache (eCH) (34/146 (23{\%}) vs 33/253 (13{\%}), respectively, P = .008). A history of THI was more common in patients than controls (173/400 (43{\%}) vs 51/200 (26{\%}), respectively, P < .0001) and in chronic compared to eCH (77/146 (53{\%}) vs 96/253 (37{\%}), respectively, P = .004). Patients with a positive family history had a unique diurnal attack pattern with twice the risk of nocturnal attacks as patients who did not report family history. Patients reporting phenotype change had a chronobiological fingerprint similar to the phenotype they had experienced a transition into. A higher attack frequency in chronic patients was the only difference in symptom manifestation across all analyzed subgroups of patients.CONCLUSIONS: cCH is associated with a positive family history and THI. In familial CH, a peak in nocturnal chronorisk may implicate genes involved in diurnal-, sleep- and homeostatic regulation. The stereotypical nature of the CH attacks themselves is confirmed and differences between subgroups should be sought in other characteristics.",
keywords = "biological rhythm disorders, cluster headache, traumatic brain injuries",
author = "Barloese, {Mads C J} and Beske, {Rasmus P} and Petersen, {Anja S} and Bryan Haddock and Nunu Lund and Jensen, {Rigmor H}",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 American Headache Society.",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/head.13730",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "515--525",
journal = "Headache Online",
issn = "1526-4610",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Episodic and Chronic Cluster Headache

T2 - Differences in Family History, Traumatic Head Injury, and Chronorisk

AU - Barloese, Mads C J

AU - Beske, Rasmus P

AU - Petersen, Anja S

AU - Haddock, Bryan

AU - Lund, Nunu

AU - Jensen, Rigmor H

N1 - © 2019 American Headache Society.

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND: The diagnostic criteria of episodic and chronic cluster headache (cCH) were recently modified, yet pathophysiological differences between the two are still unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to identify and characterize other differences between episodic and cCH.METHODS: Data from a retrospective, questionnaire- and interview-based study were analyzed with a focus on associated factors including traumatic head injury (THI), familial history, and change of phenotype. Attack patterns were analyzed using Gaussian and spectral modeling.RESULTS: 400 patients and 200 controls participated. A positive family history was more prevalent in chronic than episodic cluster headache (eCH) (34/146 (23%) vs 33/253 (13%), respectively, P = .008). A history of THI was more common in patients than controls (173/400 (43%) vs 51/200 (26%), respectively, P < .0001) and in chronic compared to eCH (77/146 (53%) vs 96/253 (37%), respectively, P = .004). Patients with a positive family history had a unique diurnal attack pattern with twice the risk of nocturnal attacks as patients who did not report family history. Patients reporting phenotype change had a chronobiological fingerprint similar to the phenotype they had experienced a transition into. A higher attack frequency in chronic patients was the only difference in symptom manifestation across all analyzed subgroups of patients.CONCLUSIONS: cCH is associated with a positive family history and THI. In familial CH, a peak in nocturnal chronorisk may implicate genes involved in diurnal-, sleep- and homeostatic regulation. The stereotypical nature of the CH attacks themselves is confirmed and differences between subgroups should be sought in other characteristics.

AB - OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND: The diagnostic criteria of episodic and chronic cluster headache (cCH) were recently modified, yet pathophysiological differences between the two are still unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to identify and characterize other differences between episodic and cCH.METHODS: Data from a retrospective, questionnaire- and interview-based study were analyzed with a focus on associated factors including traumatic head injury (THI), familial history, and change of phenotype. Attack patterns were analyzed using Gaussian and spectral modeling.RESULTS: 400 patients and 200 controls participated. A positive family history was more prevalent in chronic than episodic cluster headache (eCH) (34/146 (23%) vs 33/253 (13%), respectively, P = .008). A history of THI was more common in patients than controls (173/400 (43%) vs 51/200 (26%), respectively, P < .0001) and in chronic compared to eCH (77/146 (53%) vs 96/253 (37%), respectively, P = .004). Patients with a positive family history had a unique diurnal attack pattern with twice the risk of nocturnal attacks as patients who did not report family history. Patients reporting phenotype change had a chronobiological fingerprint similar to the phenotype they had experienced a transition into. A higher attack frequency in chronic patients was the only difference in symptom manifestation across all analyzed subgroups of patients.CONCLUSIONS: cCH is associated with a positive family history and THI. In familial CH, a peak in nocturnal chronorisk may implicate genes involved in diurnal-, sleep- and homeostatic regulation. The stereotypical nature of the CH attacks themselves is confirmed and differences between subgroups should be sought in other characteristics.

KW - biological rhythm disorders

KW - cluster headache

KW - traumatic brain injuries

U2 - 10.1111/head.13730

DO - 10.1111/head.13730

M3 - Journal article

VL - 60

SP - 515

EP - 525

JO - Headache Online

JF - Headache Online

SN - 1526-4610

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 58720892