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Emotional cognition subgroups in mood disorders: Associations with familial risk

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@article{d35c9dd02a3b474696fb90f3da1fa161,
title = "Emotional cognition subgroups in mood disorders: Associations with familial risk",
abstract = "Patients with mood disorders show heterogeneity in non-emotional cognition. However, it is unclear whether emotional cognition (EC) is characterised by similar heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the heterogeneity in EC among remitted patients with mood disorders and explore its association with familial risk. Data from 269 partially or fully remitted patients with mood disorders, 87 of their unaffected relatives (UR) and 203 healthy controls (HC) were pooled from two cohort studies. Hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted using the EC data from patients. UR were categorised into groups consistent with their affected relatives' cluster assignment. Clusters were compared to HC on EC, non-emotional cognition, clinical characteristics and functioning. We identified three clusters: an 'emotionally preserved' (57%), an 'emotionally blunted' (26%) and an 'emotionally volatile' cluster (17%). 'Emotionally blunted' and 'emotionally volatile' patients also presented more deficits in non-emotional cognition (global cognition read z=-0.3 and -0.5 respectively). Relatives of 'emotionally preserved' patients were more successful at dampening negative emotions (p=.01, d=0.39, 95% CI [-0.76,-0.09]), whereas UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients underperformed in verbal fluency (p=.03, d=0.46, 95% CI [.03, 0.68]) compared to HC. The existence of impaired EC groups in remitted mood disorder highlights a need to screen for and treat EC in mood disorders. Improved ability to dampen emotions in UR of 'emotionally preserved' patients may reflect a resilience marker while impaired verbal fluency in UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients may reflect distinct genetic risk profiles in these EC subgroups.",
keywords = "Cluster-analysis, Emotional cognition, Emotional processing, Emotional regulation, Mood disorders",
author = "Cristina Varo and Kj{\ae}rstad, {Hanne Lie} and Emilie Poulsen and Iselin Meluken and Eduard Vieta and Kessing, {Lars Vedel} and Maj Vinberg and Miskowiak, {Kamilla Woznica}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1016/j.euroneuro.2021.05.003",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "71--83",
journal = "European Neuropsychopharmacology",
issn = "0924-977X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emotional cognition subgroups in mood disorders

T2 - Associations with familial risk

AU - Varo, Cristina

AU - Kjærstad, Hanne Lie

AU - Poulsen, Emilie

AU - Meluken, Iselin

AU - Vieta, Eduard

AU - Kessing, Lars Vedel

AU - Vinberg, Maj

AU - Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica

N1 - Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - Patients with mood disorders show heterogeneity in non-emotional cognition. However, it is unclear whether emotional cognition (EC) is characterised by similar heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the heterogeneity in EC among remitted patients with mood disorders and explore its association with familial risk. Data from 269 partially or fully remitted patients with mood disorders, 87 of their unaffected relatives (UR) and 203 healthy controls (HC) were pooled from two cohort studies. Hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted using the EC data from patients. UR were categorised into groups consistent with their affected relatives' cluster assignment. Clusters were compared to HC on EC, non-emotional cognition, clinical characteristics and functioning. We identified three clusters: an 'emotionally preserved' (57%), an 'emotionally blunted' (26%) and an 'emotionally volatile' cluster (17%). 'Emotionally blunted' and 'emotionally volatile' patients also presented more deficits in non-emotional cognition (global cognition read z=-0.3 and -0.5 respectively). Relatives of 'emotionally preserved' patients were more successful at dampening negative emotions (p=.01, d=0.39, 95% CI [-0.76,-0.09]), whereas UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients underperformed in verbal fluency (p=.03, d=0.46, 95% CI [.03, 0.68]) compared to HC. The existence of impaired EC groups in remitted mood disorder highlights a need to screen for and treat EC in mood disorders. Improved ability to dampen emotions in UR of 'emotionally preserved' patients may reflect a resilience marker while impaired verbal fluency in UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients may reflect distinct genetic risk profiles in these EC subgroups.

AB - Patients with mood disorders show heterogeneity in non-emotional cognition. However, it is unclear whether emotional cognition (EC) is characterised by similar heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the heterogeneity in EC among remitted patients with mood disorders and explore its association with familial risk. Data from 269 partially or fully remitted patients with mood disorders, 87 of their unaffected relatives (UR) and 203 healthy controls (HC) were pooled from two cohort studies. Hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted using the EC data from patients. UR were categorised into groups consistent with their affected relatives' cluster assignment. Clusters were compared to HC on EC, non-emotional cognition, clinical characteristics and functioning. We identified three clusters: an 'emotionally preserved' (57%), an 'emotionally blunted' (26%) and an 'emotionally volatile' cluster (17%). 'Emotionally blunted' and 'emotionally volatile' patients also presented more deficits in non-emotional cognition (global cognition read z=-0.3 and -0.5 respectively). Relatives of 'emotionally preserved' patients were more successful at dampening negative emotions (p=.01, d=0.39, 95% CI [-0.76,-0.09]), whereas UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients underperformed in verbal fluency (p=.03, d=0.46, 95% CI [.03, 0.68]) compared to HC. The existence of impaired EC groups in remitted mood disorder highlights a need to screen for and treat EC in mood disorders. Improved ability to dampen emotions in UR of 'emotionally preserved' patients may reflect a resilience marker while impaired verbal fluency in UR of 'emotionally impaired' patients may reflect distinct genetic risk profiles in these EC subgroups.

KW - Cluster-analysis

KW - Emotional cognition

KW - Emotional processing

KW - Emotional regulation

KW - Mood disorders

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85108110629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2021.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2021.05.003

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34098515

VL - 51

SP - 71

EP - 83

JO - European Neuropsychopharmacology

JF - European Neuropsychopharmacology

SN - 0924-977X

ER -

ID: 67031101