Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Effects of anemia and blood transfusion on clot formation and platelet function in patients with septic shock: a substudy of the randomized TRISS trial

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Plasma as a resuscitation fluid for volume-depleted shock: Potential benefits and risks

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKommentar/debatForskningpeer review

  2. Smoking and risk of surgical bleeding: nationwide analysis of 5,452,411 surgical cases

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. The donors perceived positive and negative effects of blood donation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Can text messages save lives? A field experiment on blood donor motivation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Handling oxygenation targets in ICU patients with COVID-19-Protocol and statistical analysis plan in the HOT-COVID trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Investigating the inflammation marker neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in Danish blood donors with restless legs syndrome

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Low-dose hydrocortisone in patients with COVID-19 and severe hypoxia: the COVID STEROID randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: The effects of anemia and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion on markers of clot formation and platelet function in patients with septic shock are unknown. We assessed these effects in a randomized transfusion trial of patients with septic shock.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a prospective substudy of the Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial, randomly assigning patients in the intensive care unit with septic shock and hemoglobin concentration of 9.0 g/dL or less to transfusion with one unit of RBCs at a hemoglobin level of 9.0 g/dL or a level of 7.0 g/dL. We assessed thromboelastography (TEG), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), platelet count, and international normalized ratio (INR) immediately before and after the first blood transfusion and again 3 hours after. The effects of hemoglobin level were analyzed using multiple linear regression and the association between markers of hemostasis and subsequent bleeding by Cox regression models.

RESULTS: We included 58 patients in this substudy. We observed no differences in whole blood clot formation, platelet count or function, or INR between patients with hemoglobin levels of 7.0 and 9.0 g/dL, and we found no effect of RBC transfusion on these markers. Platelet function, assessed by MEA, but not whole blood clot formation, was associated with subsequent bleeding.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with septic shock, the level of anemia and the transfusion of RBCs did not appear to influence clot formation or platelet function. Low platelet function, as evaluated by MEA, was associated with increased risk of subsequent bleeding.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransfusion
Vol/bind58
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)2807-2818
Antal sider12
ISSN0041-1132
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2018

ID: 56119612