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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Donor Smoking and Older Age Increases Morbidity and Mortality After Lung Transplantation

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  1. Variation in Time to Peak Values for Different Lung Function Parameters After Double Lung Transplantation

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  2. Hyaluronic Acid Is a Biomarker for Allograft Dysfunction and Predicts 1-Year Graft Loss After Liver Transplantation

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  3. Donor Kidney With Renal Cell Carcinoma Successfully Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation: A Case Report

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  4. First Report of Lung Transplantation in a Patient With Active Pulmonary Mycobacterium simiae Infection

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  2. Lung Ultrasound to Phenotype Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction in Lung Transplant Recipients. A Prospective Observational Study

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  3. Prognostic impact of ventilation-perfusion defects and pulmonary diffusing capacity after single lung transplantation

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BACKGROUND: The lack of lung transplant donors has necessitated the use of donors with a smoking history and donors of older age. We have evaluated the effects of donor smoking history and age on recipient morbidity and mortality with baseline values of pulmonary function and survival free of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) as morbidity variables.

METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of 588 consecutive lung transplant recipients and their corresponding 454 donors. Donors were divided into three groups: group 1 included smokers, group 2 nonsmokers, and group 3 had unknown smoking status; these were further divided into three age groups: group A: 0 to 39 years; group B: 40 to 54 years; and group C: ≥55 years.

RESULTS: One hundred fifty-one donors were former or actual smokers, 175 were nonsmokers, and 128 had unknown smoking histories. Baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide were lowest in the groups who received lungs from a smoking donor. CLAD-free survival was identical in all smoking groups, and overall survival was better both for lungs from nonsmoking donors and donors with unknown smoking status compared to lungs from smoking donors. One hundred sixty-nine donors were in age group A, 203 in B, and 82 in C. Baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide were lowest in the groups who received lungs from donors older than 55 years. Overall survival as well as CLAD-free survival was significantly lower with donors ≥55 years.

CONCLUSIONS: Donor smoking history and older donor age impact lung function, mortality, and CLAD-free survival after transplantation. Because of a shortage of organs, extended donor criteria may be considered while taking waiting list mortality into account.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransplantation Proceedings
Vol/bind49
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)2161-2168
Antal sider8
ISSN0041-1345
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2017

ID: 52781067