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Does shared family background influence the impact of educational differences on early mortality?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

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  • Grethe Søndergaard
  • Laust Hvas Mortensen
  • Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
  • Per Kragh Andersen
  • Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
  • Mia Lund Madsen
  • Merete Osler
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The mechanisms behind social differences in mortality rates have been debated. The authors examined the extent to which shared family background and health in early life could explain the association between educational status and all-cause mortality rates using a sibling design. The study was register-based and included all individuals born in Denmark between 1950 and 1979 who had at least 1 full sibling born in the same time period (n = 1,381,436). All individuals were followed from 28 years of age until death, emigration, or December 2009. The authors used Cox regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios for mortality according to educational level. Conventional cohort and intersibling analyses were carried out and conducted separately for deaths occurring before and after the age of 45 years, respectively. The cohort analyses showed an inverse association between educational status and all-cause mortality that was strongest for males, increased with younger birth cohorts, and tended to be strongest in the analyses of death before 45 years of age. The associations were attenuated slightly in the intersibling analyses and after adjustment for serious health conditions in early life. Hence, health selection and confounding by factors shared by siblings explained only a minor part of the association between educational level and all-cause mortality.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Vol/bind176
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)675-83
Antal sider9
ISSN0002-9262
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

ID: 36810861