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Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain? A nationwide cohort study in Denmark

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Harvard

Høeg, BL, Johansen, C, Christensen, J, Frederiksen, K, Dalton, SO, Bøge, P, Dencker, A, Dyregrov, A & Bidstrup, PE 2019, 'Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain? A nationwide cohort study in Denmark', Journal of Public Health, bind 41, nr. 2, s. 296-304. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy070

APA

Høeg, B. L., Johansen, C., Christensen, J., Frederiksen, K., Dalton, S. O., Bøge, P., Dencker, A., Dyregrov, A., & Bidstrup, P. E. (2019). Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain? A nationwide cohort study in Denmark. Journal of Public Health, 41(2), 296-304. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy070

CBE

Høeg BL, Johansen C, Christensen J, Frederiksen K, Dalton SO, Bøge P, Dencker A, Dyregrov A, Bidstrup PE. 2019. Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain? A nationwide cohort study in Denmark. Journal of Public Health. 41(2):296-304. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy070

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Høeg, B L ; Johansen, C ; Christensen, J ; Frederiksen, K ; Dalton, S Oksbjerg ; Bøge, P ; Dencker, A ; Dyregrov, A ; Bidstrup, P E. / Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain? A nationwide cohort study in Denmark. I: Journal of Public Health. 2019 ; Bind 41, Nr. 2. s. 296-304.

Bibtex

@article{3160b0f1a1714ad9808e83093853cf82,
title = "Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain?: A nationwide cohort study in Denmark",
abstract = "Background: Health inequalities are rooted in education and we investigate the association between early parental death and attainment across the educational spectrum.Methods: Using total population data on Danes born between 1982 and 2000 (n = 1 043 813), we assess incidence rate ratios (RRs) by gender for attainment of each educational level (basic school, high school or vocational training, bachelor degree or professional programme, and university graduate degree) according to loss of a parent before the age of 18 years. We adjust for family income, education and psychiatric illness and examine parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at time of death as potential moderators.Results: Bereaved people had significantly lower attainment rates than non-bereaved people: basic school (RR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.97 for men and 0.96; 0.94-0.98 for women), high school or vocational training (0.78; 0.76-0.80 for men and 0.82; 0.80-0.84 for women), bachelor degree or professional programme (0.74; 0.70-0.79 for men and 0.83; 0.79-0.86 for women) and university graduate degree (0.77; 0.68-0.86 for men and 0.77; 0.69-0.86 for women). Parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at the death did not modify the associations.Conclusions: As education impacts population health, support for bereaved school children may be more important than realized.",
author = "H{\o}eg, {B L} and C Johansen and J Christensen and K Frederiksen and Dalton, {S Oksbjerg} and P B{\o}ge and A Dencker and A Dyregrov and Bidstrup, {P E}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1093/pubmed/fdy070",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "296--304",
journal = "Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1741-3842",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does losing a parent early influence the education you obtain?

T2 - A nationwide cohort study in Denmark

AU - Høeg, B L

AU - Johansen, C

AU - Christensen, J

AU - Frederiksen, K

AU - Dalton, S Oksbjerg

AU - Bøge, P

AU - Dencker, A

AU - Dyregrov, A

AU - Bidstrup, P E

N1 - © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Health inequalities are rooted in education and we investigate the association between early parental death and attainment across the educational spectrum.Methods: Using total population data on Danes born between 1982 and 2000 (n = 1 043 813), we assess incidence rate ratios (RRs) by gender for attainment of each educational level (basic school, high school or vocational training, bachelor degree or professional programme, and university graduate degree) according to loss of a parent before the age of 18 years. We adjust for family income, education and psychiatric illness and examine parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at time of death as potential moderators.Results: Bereaved people had significantly lower attainment rates than non-bereaved people: basic school (RR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.97 for men and 0.96; 0.94-0.98 for women), high school or vocational training (0.78; 0.76-0.80 for men and 0.82; 0.80-0.84 for women), bachelor degree or professional programme (0.74; 0.70-0.79 for men and 0.83; 0.79-0.86 for women) and university graduate degree (0.77; 0.68-0.86 for men and 0.77; 0.69-0.86 for women). Parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at the death did not modify the associations.Conclusions: As education impacts population health, support for bereaved school children may be more important than realized.

AB - Background: Health inequalities are rooted in education and we investigate the association between early parental death and attainment across the educational spectrum.Methods: Using total population data on Danes born between 1982 and 2000 (n = 1 043 813), we assess incidence rate ratios (RRs) by gender for attainment of each educational level (basic school, high school or vocational training, bachelor degree or professional programme, and university graduate degree) according to loss of a parent before the age of 18 years. We adjust for family income, education and psychiatric illness and examine parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at time of death as potential moderators.Results: Bereaved people had significantly lower attainment rates than non-bereaved people: basic school (RR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.97 for men and 0.96; 0.94-0.98 for women), high school or vocational training (0.78; 0.76-0.80 for men and 0.82; 0.80-0.84 for women), bachelor degree or professional programme (0.74; 0.70-0.79 for men and 0.83; 0.79-0.86 for women) and university graduate degree (0.77; 0.68-0.86 for men and 0.77; 0.69-0.86 for women). Parent's gender, cause of death and child's age at the death did not modify the associations.Conclusions: As education impacts population health, support for bereaved school children may be more important than realized.

U2 - 10.1093/pubmed/fdy070

DO - 10.1093/pubmed/fdy070

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29684221

VL - 41

SP - 296

EP - 304

JO - Journal of Public Health

JF - Journal of Public Health

SN - 1741-3842

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 55811990