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Udgivet

Does inflammation have a role in migraine?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

Migraine is a prevalent disorder, affecting 15.1% of the world's population. In most cases, the migraine attacks are sporadic; however, some individuals experience a gradual increase in attack frequency over time, and up to 2% of the general population develop chronic migraine. The mechanisms underlying this chronicity are unresolved but are hypothesized to involve a degree of inflammation. In this article, we review the relevant literature related to inflammation and migraine, from the initiation of attacks to chronification. We propose that the increase in migraine frequency leading to chronic migraine involves neurogenic neuroinflammation, possibly entailing increased expression of cytokines via activation of protein kinases in neurons and glial cells of the trigeminovascular system. We present evidence from preclinical research that supports this view and discuss the implications for migraine therapy.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNature reviews. Neurology
Vol/bind15
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)483-490
Antal sider8
ISSN1759-4758
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2019

ID: 57526634