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Diabetes and ischemic heart disease: double jeopardy with regard to depressive mood and reduced quality of life

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@article{802a22420eeb4a98b6f2ce0062edab34,
title = "Diabetes and ischemic heart disease: double jeopardy with regard to depressive mood and reduced quality of life",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the SF-36 Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36 QOL), the WHO-5 Well-being Index, and the clinical stress signs (CSSs) scale. Participants with diabetes and IHD had a higher MDI score, a lower SF-36 physical component summary score, and a lower score of several sub-measurements of the SF-36 mental component score when compared with patients with IHD without diabetes. No significant differences were observed regarding stress measured by the PPS measure, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, or the number of CSSs. In conclusion, the combination of diabetes and IHD seems to be associated with increased depressive symptoms, lower overall physical QOL, and reduced mental QOL on several sub-elements of the questionnaire. This should be recognized in the management of patients with double diagnoses.",
author = "Natasha Bergmann and S{\o}ren Ballegaard and Pernille Holmager and Per Bech and Ake Hjalmarson and Finn Gyntelberg and Jens Faber",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 The authors.",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1530/EC-14-0083",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "156--60",
journal = "Endocrine Connections",
issn = "2049-3614",
publisher = "BioScientifica Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

T2 - double jeopardy with regard to depressive mood and reduced quality of life

AU - Bergmann, Natasha

AU - Ballegaard, Søren

AU - Holmager, Pernille

AU - Bech, Per

AU - Hjalmarson, Ake

AU - Gyntelberg, Finn

AU - Faber, Jens

N1 - © 2014 The authors.

PY - 2014/12

Y1 - 2014/12

N2 - The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the SF-36 Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36 QOL), the WHO-5 Well-being Index, and the clinical stress signs (CSSs) scale. Participants with diabetes and IHD had a higher MDI score, a lower SF-36 physical component summary score, and a lower score of several sub-measurements of the SF-36 mental component score when compared with patients with IHD without diabetes. No significant differences were observed regarding stress measured by the PPS measure, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, or the number of CSSs. In conclusion, the combination of diabetes and IHD seems to be associated with increased depressive symptoms, lower overall physical QOL, and reduced mental QOL on several sub-elements of the questionnaire. This should be recognized in the management of patients with double diagnoses.

AB - The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the SF-36 Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36 QOL), the WHO-5 Well-being Index, and the clinical stress signs (CSSs) scale. Participants with diabetes and IHD had a higher MDI score, a lower SF-36 physical component summary score, and a lower score of several sub-measurements of the SF-36 mental component score when compared with patients with IHD without diabetes. No significant differences were observed regarding stress measured by the PPS measure, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, or the number of CSSs. In conclusion, the combination of diabetes and IHD seems to be associated with increased depressive symptoms, lower overall physical QOL, and reduced mental QOL on several sub-elements of the questionnaire. This should be recognized in the management of patients with double diagnoses.

U2 - 10.1530/EC-14-0083

DO - 10.1530/EC-14-0083

M3 - Journal article

VL - 3

SP - 156

EP - 160

JO - Endocrine Connections

JF - Endocrine Connections

SN - 2049-3614

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 44852735