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Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in individuals with obesity

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Dandanell, Sune ; Præst, Charlotte Boslev ; Søndergård, Stine Dam ; Skovborg, Camilla ; Dela, Flemming ; Larsen, Steen ; Helge, Jørn Wulff. / Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in individuals with obesity. I: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. 2017 ; Bind 42, Nr. 4. s. 405-412.

Bibtex

@article{2f7edd92ade14de7b87ae2ed0b254449,
title = "Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in individuals with obesity",
abstract = "Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and the exercise intensity that elicits MFO (FatMax) are commonly determined by indirect calorimetry during graded exercise tests in both obese and normal-weight individuals. However, no protocol has been validated in individuals with obesity. Thus, the aims were to develop a graded exercise protocol for determination of FatMax in individuals with obesity, and to test validity and inter-method reliability. Fat oxidation was assessed over a range of exercise intensities in 16 individuals (age: 28 (26-29) years; body mass index: 36 (35-38) kg·m(-2); 95% confidence interval) on a cycle ergometer. The graded exercise protocol was validated against a short continuous exercise (SCE) protocol, in which FatMax was determined from fat oxidation at rest and during 10 min of continuous exercise at 35%, 50%, and 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. Intraclass and Pearson correlation coefficients between the protocols were 0.75 and 0.72 and within-subject coefficient of variation (CV) was 5 (3-7)%. A Bland-Altman plot revealed a bias of -3% points of maximal oxygen uptake (limits of agreement: -12 to 7). A tendency towards a systematic difference (p = 0.06) was observed, where FatMax occurred at 42 (40-44)% and 45 (43-47)% of maximal oxygen uptake with the graded and the SCE protocol, respectively. In conclusion, there was a high-excellent correlation and a low CV between the 2 protocols, suggesting that the graded exercise protocol has a high inter-method reliability. However, considerable intra-individual variation and a trend towards systematic difference between the protocols reveal that further optimization of the graded exercise protocol is needed to improve validity.",
keywords = "Adult, Bicycling, Body Mass Index, Energy Metabolism, Ergometry, Exercise, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Female, Glycerol, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Lipolysis, Male, Obesity, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxygen Consumption, Physical Exertion, Reproducibility of Results, Retrospective Studies, Sex Characteristics, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Validation Studies",
author = "Sune Dandanell and Pr{\ae}st, {Charlotte Boslev} and S{\o}nderg{\aa}rd, {Stine Dam} and Camilla Skovborg and Flemming Dela and Steen Larsen and Helge, {J{\o}rn Wulff}",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1139/apnm-2016-0518",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "405--412",
journal = "Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism",
issn = "1715-5312",
publisher = "N R C Research Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in individuals with obesity

AU - Dandanell, Sune

AU - Præst, Charlotte Boslev

AU - Søndergård, Stine Dam

AU - Skovborg, Camilla

AU - Dela, Flemming

AU - Larsen, Steen

AU - Helge, Jørn Wulff

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and the exercise intensity that elicits MFO (FatMax) are commonly determined by indirect calorimetry during graded exercise tests in both obese and normal-weight individuals. However, no protocol has been validated in individuals with obesity. Thus, the aims were to develop a graded exercise protocol for determination of FatMax in individuals with obesity, and to test validity and inter-method reliability. Fat oxidation was assessed over a range of exercise intensities in 16 individuals (age: 28 (26-29) years; body mass index: 36 (35-38) kg·m(-2); 95% confidence interval) on a cycle ergometer. The graded exercise protocol was validated against a short continuous exercise (SCE) protocol, in which FatMax was determined from fat oxidation at rest and during 10 min of continuous exercise at 35%, 50%, and 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. Intraclass and Pearson correlation coefficients between the protocols were 0.75 and 0.72 and within-subject coefficient of variation (CV) was 5 (3-7)%. A Bland-Altman plot revealed a bias of -3% points of maximal oxygen uptake (limits of agreement: -12 to 7). A tendency towards a systematic difference (p = 0.06) was observed, where FatMax occurred at 42 (40-44)% and 45 (43-47)% of maximal oxygen uptake with the graded and the SCE protocol, respectively. In conclusion, there was a high-excellent correlation and a low CV between the 2 protocols, suggesting that the graded exercise protocol has a high inter-method reliability. However, considerable intra-individual variation and a trend towards systematic difference between the protocols reveal that further optimization of the graded exercise protocol is needed to improve validity.

AB - Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and the exercise intensity that elicits MFO (FatMax) are commonly determined by indirect calorimetry during graded exercise tests in both obese and normal-weight individuals. However, no protocol has been validated in individuals with obesity. Thus, the aims were to develop a graded exercise protocol for determination of FatMax in individuals with obesity, and to test validity and inter-method reliability. Fat oxidation was assessed over a range of exercise intensities in 16 individuals (age: 28 (26-29) years; body mass index: 36 (35-38) kg·m(-2); 95% confidence interval) on a cycle ergometer. The graded exercise protocol was validated against a short continuous exercise (SCE) protocol, in which FatMax was determined from fat oxidation at rest and during 10 min of continuous exercise at 35%, 50%, and 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. Intraclass and Pearson correlation coefficients between the protocols were 0.75 and 0.72 and within-subject coefficient of variation (CV) was 5 (3-7)%. A Bland-Altman plot revealed a bias of -3% points of maximal oxygen uptake (limits of agreement: -12 to 7). A tendency towards a systematic difference (p = 0.06) was observed, where FatMax occurred at 42 (40-44)% and 45 (43-47)% of maximal oxygen uptake with the graded and the SCE protocol, respectively. In conclusion, there was a high-excellent correlation and a low CV between the 2 protocols, suggesting that the graded exercise protocol has a high inter-method reliability. However, considerable intra-individual variation and a trend towards systematic difference between the protocols reveal that further optimization of the graded exercise protocol is needed to improve validity.

KW - Adult

KW - Bicycling

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Energy Metabolism

KW - Ergometry

KW - Exercise

KW - Fatty Acids, Nonesterified

KW - Female

KW - Glycerol

KW - Humans

KW - Lipid Metabolism

KW - Lipolysis

KW - Male

KW - Obesity

KW - Oxidation-Reduction

KW - Oxygen Consumption

KW - Physical Exertion

KW - Reproducibility of Results

KW - Retrospective Studies

KW - Sex Characteristics

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Validation Studies

U2 - 10.1139/apnm-2016-0518

DO - 10.1139/apnm-2016-0518

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28177732

VL - 42

SP - 405

EP - 412

JO - Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism

JF - Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism

SN - 1715-5312

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 51613281