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Cuff inflations do not affect night-time blood pressure: comparison of 24 h ambulatory blood pressure measured by a cuff and a tonometric device in type 2 diabetes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Discomfort related to cuff inflation may bias 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements, especially during night-time. We accessed the impact of cuff inflations by comparing 24 h BP recorded with a cuff-less tonometric wrist device and an upper-arm oscillometric cuff device. Fifty-three participants with type 2 diabetes were assigned randomly to four 24-h BP recordings with a cuff (TM2430: visit 1 or 2, and 4) and a tonometric device (BPro: visit 1 or 2, 3, and 4). The mean 24 h systolic BP was significantly higher when measured with the cuff versus the tonometric device (141.6±14.6 vs. 128.3±14.6 mmHg, P≤0.01), as was nocturnal BP (6.7±5.3 vs. 10.3±7.6%, P=0.002). In conclusion, nocturnal BP decline was higher when measured with the cuff device, suggesting that cuff inflations did not increase night-time BP. Further evaluation of the tonometric device using the updated European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010 is recommended before applying it in daily clinical practice.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBlood Pressure Monitoring
Vol/bind20
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)369-72
Antal sider4
ISSN1359-5237
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2015
Eksternt udgivetJa

ID: 51477711