Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Cortical involvement in anticipatory postural reactions in man

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Sensory defunctionalization induced by 8% topical capsaicin treatment in a model of ultraviolet-B-induced cutaneous hyperalgesia

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Influence of visual feedback, hand dominance and sex on individuated finger movements

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Improved assessment of outcomes following transient global cerebral ischemia in mice

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Effects of dopaminergic treatment on functional cortico-cortical connectivity in Parkinson's disease

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Cue integration and the perception of action in intentional binding

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer
All movements are accompanied by postural reactions which ensure that the balance of the body is maintained. It has not been resolved that to what extent the primary motor cortex and corticospinal tract are involved in the control of these reactions. Here, we investigated the contribution of the corticospinal tract to the activation of the soleus (SOL) muscle in standing human subjects (n=10) in relation to voluntary heel raise, anticipatory postural activation of the soleus muscle when the subject pulled a handle and to reflex activation of the soleus muscle when the subject was suddenly pulled forward by an external perturbation. SOL motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increased significantly in relation to rest -75 ms prior to the onset of EMG in the heel-raise and handle-pull tasks. The short-latency facilitation of the soleus H-reflex evoked by TMS increased similarly, suggesting that the increased MEP size prior to movement was caused at least partly by increased excitability of corticospinal tract cells with monosynaptic projections to SOL motoneurones. Changes in spinal motoneuronal excitability could be ruled out since there was no significant increase of the SOL H-reflex until immediately prior to EMG onset for any of the tasks. Tibialis anterior MEPs were unaltered prior to the onset of SOL EMG activity in the handle-pull task, suggesting that the MEP facilitation was specific for the SOL muscle. No significant increase of the MEPs was observed prior to EMG onset for the external perturbation. These data suggest that the primary motor cortex is involved in activating the SOL muscle as part of an anticipatory postural reaction.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftExperimental Brain Research
Vol/bind193
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)161-71
Antal sider11
ISSN0014-4819
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2009

ID: 36936787