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Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men

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@article{e1382cd52b3441beac133fd4288b0990,
title = "Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men",
abstract = "CONTEXT: The colon houses most of humans' gut microbiota, which ferments indigestible carbohydrates. The products of fermentation have been proposed to influence the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) from the many endocrine cells in the colonic epithelium. However, little is known about the colonic contribution to fasting or postprandial plasma levels of L-cell products.OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of colonic lactulose fermentation on gut peptide secretion and to evaluate whether colonic endocrine secretion contributes to gut hormone concentrations measurable in the fasting state.METHODS: Ten healthy young men were studied on 3 occasions after an overnight fast. On 2 study days, lactulose (20 g) was given orally and compared to water intake on a third study day. For 1 of the lactulose visits, participants underwent a full colonic evacuation. Over a 6-h study protocol, lactulose fermentation was assessed by measuring exhaled hydrogen, and gut peptide secretion, paracetamol, and short-chain fatty acid levels were measured in plasma.RESULTS: Colonic evacuation markedly reduced hydrogen exhalation after lactulose intake (P = 0.013). Our analysis suggests that the colon does not account for the measurable amounts of GLP-1 and PYY present in the circulation during fasting and that fermentation and peptide secretion are not acutely related.CONCLUSION: Whether colonic luminal contents affect colonic L-cell secretion sufficiently to influence circulating concentrations requires further investigation. Colonic evacuation markedly reduced lactulose fermentation, but hormone releases were unchanged in the present study.",
keywords = "colon, lactulose, fermentation, GLP-1, PYY, short-chain fatty acids, Administration, Oral, Humans, Lactulose/administration & dosage, Male, Fermentation, Healthy Volunteers, Colon/metabolism, Cross-Over Studies, Young Adult, Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology, Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism, Adult, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/blood, Peptide YY/blood",
author = "Christiansen, {Charlotte Bayer} and Simon Veedfald and Bolette Hartmann and Gauguin, {Astrid Marie} and S{\o}ren M{\o}ller and Thomas Moritz and Sten Madsbad and Holst, {Jens Juul}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2022",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/clinem/dgab666",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "77--87",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The/Endocrine Society",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men

AU - Christiansen, Charlotte Bayer

AU - Veedfald, Simon

AU - Hartmann, Bolette

AU - Gauguin, Astrid Marie

AU - Møller, Søren

AU - Moritz, Thomas

AU - Madsbad, Sten

AU - Holst, Jens Juul

N1 - © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2022/1/1

Y1 - 2022/1/1

N2 - CONTEXT: The colon houses most of humans' gut microbiota, which ferments indigestible carbohydrates. The products of fermentation have been proposed to influence the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) from the many endocrine cells in the colonic epithelium. However, little is known about the colonic contribution to fasting or postprandial plasma levels of L-cell products.OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of colonic lactulose fermentation on gut peptide secretion and to evaluate whether colonic endocrine secretion contributes to gut hormone concentrations measurable in the fasting state.METHODS: Ten healthy young men were studied on 3 occasions after an overnight fast. On 2 study days, lactulose (20 g) was given orally and compared to water intake on a third study day. For 1 of the lactulose visits, participants underwent a full colonic evacuation. Over a 6-h study protocol, lactulose fermentation was assessed by measuring exhaled hydrogen, and gut peptide secretion, paracetamol, and short-chain fatty acid levels were measured in plasma.RESULTS: Colonic evacuation markedly reduced hydrogen exhalation after lactulose intake (P = 0.013). Our analysis suggests that the colon does not account for the measurable amounts of GLP-1 and PYY present in the circulation during fasting and that fermentation and peptide secretion are not acutely related.CONCLUSION: Whether colonic luminal contents affect colonic L-cell secretion sufficiently to influence circulating concentrations requires further investigation. Colonic evacuation markedly reduced lactulose fermentation, but hormone releases were unchanged in the present study.

AB - CONTEXT: The colon houses most of humans' gut microbiota, which ferments indigestible carbohydrates. The products of fermentation have been proposed to influence the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) from the many endocrine cells in the colonic epithelium. However, little is known about the colonic contribution to fasting or postprandial plasma levels of L-cell products.OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of colonic lactulose fermentation on gut peptide secretion and to evaluate whether colonic endocrine secretion contributes to gut hormone concentrations measurable in the fasting state.METHODS: Ten healthy young men were studied on 3 occasions after an overnight fast. On 2 study days, lactulose (20 g) was given orally and compared to water intake on a third study day. For 1 of the lactulose visits, participants underwent a full colonic evacuation. Over a 6-h study protocol, lactulose fermentation was assessed by measuring exhaled hydrogen, and gut peptide secretion, paracetamol, and short-chain fatty acid levels were measured in plasma.RESULTS: Colonic evacuation markedly reduced hydrogen exhalation after lactulose intake (P = 0.013). Our analysis suggests that the colon does not account for the measurable amounts of GLP-1 and PYY present in the circulation during fasting and that fermentation and peptide secretion are not acutely related.CONCLUSION: Whether colonic luminal contents affect colonic L-cell secretion sufficiently to influence circulating concentrations requires further investigation. Colonic evacuation markedly reduced lactulose fermentation, but hormone releases were unchanged in the present study.

KW - colon

KW - lactulose

KW - fermentation

KW - GLP-1

KW - PYY

KW - short-chain fatty acids

KW - Administration, Oral

KW - Humans

KW - Lactulose/administration & dosage

KW - Male

KW - Fermentation

KW - Healthy Volunteers

KW - Colon/metabolism

KW - Cross-Over Studies

KW - Young Adult

KW - Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology

KW - Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism

KW - Adult

KW - Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/blood

KW - Peptide YY/blood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85124916728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/clinem/dgab666

DO - 10.1210/clinem/dgab666

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34508600

VL - 107

SP - 77

EP - 87

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 1

M1 - dgab666

ER -

ID: 67611468