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Chronic Diseases in High-Cost Users of Hospital, Primary Care, and Prescription Medication in the Capital Region of Denmark

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@article{2b14a08ee85448cf8bd5664e0ad2fbf9,
title = "Chronic Diseases in High-Cost Users of Hospital, Primary Care, and Prescription Medication in the Capital Region of Denmark",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A small proportion of patients account for the majority of health care costs. This group is often referred to as high-cost users (HCU). A frequently described characteristic of HCU is chronic disease. Yet, there is a gap in understanding the economic burden of chronic diseases associated with HCU to different types of health care services.OBJECTIVE: To analyze which frequent chronic diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall, and HCU in hospital, primary care, and prescription medication.DESIGN: This is a register-based observational study on Danish health service costs for various diseases in different medical settings.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1,350,677 individuals aged ≥ 18 years living in the Capital Region of Denmark by 1 January 2012 were included.MAIN MEASURES: Chronic diseases, costs, and sociodemographic data were extracted from the nationwide registers, including data from hospitals, primary care, and medicine consumption. These information were merged on an individual level.KEY RESULTS: Cancer, mental disorders except depression, and heart diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall. Mental disorders except depression were in the three diseases most prevalent in HCU in all the three health care services.CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the chronic diseases that have the strongest association with HCU differ between different types of health care services. Our findings may be helpful in informing future policies about health care organization and may guide to different prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation strategies that could lessen the burden in the hospital.",
author = "Toxv{\ae}rd, {Cecilie Goltermann} and Benthien, {Kirstine Skov} and Andreasen, {Anne Helms} and Ann Nielsen and Merete Osler and Johansen, {Nanna Borup}",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1007/s11606-019-05315-w",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "2421--2426",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic Diseases in High-Cost Users of Hospital, Primary Care, and Prescription Medication in the Capital Region of Denmark

AU - Toxværd, Cecilie Goltermann

AU - Benthien, Kirstine Skov

AU - Andreasen, Anne Helms

AU - Nielsen, Ann

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Johansen, Nanna Borup

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: A small proportion of patients account for the majority of health care costs. This group is often referred to as high-cost users (HCU). A frequently described characteristic of HCU is chronic disease. Yet, there is a gap in understanding the economic burden of chronic diseases associated with HCU to different types of health care services.OBJECTIVE: To analyze which frequent chronic diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall, and HCU in hospital, primary care, and prescription medication.DESIGN: This is a register-based observational study on Danish health service costs for various diseases in different medical settings.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1,350,677 individuals aged ≥ 18 years living in the Capital Region of Denmark by 1 January 2012 were included.MAIN MEASURES: Chronic diseases, costs, and sociodemographic data were extracted from the nationwide registers, including data from hospitals, primary care, and medicine consumption. These information were merged on an individual level.KEY RESULTS: Cancer, mental disorders except depression, and heart diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall. Mental disorders except depression were in the three diseases most prevalent in HCU in all the three health care services.CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the chronic diseases that have the strongest association with HCU differ between different types of health care services. Our findings may be helpful in informing future policies about health care organization and may guide to different prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation strategies that could lessen the burden in the hospital.

AB - BACKGROUND: A small proportion of patients account for the majority of health care costs. This group is often referred to as high-cost users (HCU). A frequently described characteristic of HCU is chronic disease. Yet, there is a gap in understanding the economic burden of chronic diseases associated with HCU to different types of health care services.OBJECTIVE: To analyze which frequent chronic diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall, and HCU in hospital, primary care, and prescription medication.DESIGN: This is a register-based observational study on Danish health service costs for various diseases in different medical settings.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1,350,677 individuals aged ≥ 18 years living in the Capital Region of Denmark by 1 January 2012 were included.MAIN MEASURES: Chronic diseases, costs, and sociodemographic data were extracted from the nationwide registers, including data from hospitals, primary care, and medicine consumption. These information were merged on an individual level.KEY RESULTS: Cancer, mental disorders except depression, and heart diseases have the strongest association with HCU overall. Mental disorders except depression were in the three diseases most prevalent in HCU in all the three health care services.CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the chronic diseases that have the strongest association with HCU differ between different types of health care services. Our findings may be helpful in informing future policies about health care organization and may guide to different prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation strategies that could lessen the burden in the hospital.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074529119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11606-019-05315-w

DO - 10.1007/s11606-019-05315-w

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31512179

VL - 34

SP - 2421

EP - 2426

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 58075227