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Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark

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Harvard

Nielsen, BF, Schmidt, AA, Mulvihill, JJ, Frederiksen, K, Tawn, EJ, Stovall, M, Johansen, C, Boice, JD & Winther, JF 2018, 'Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark', National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online), bind 110, nr. 5, s. 534-538. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djx248

APA

Nielsen, B. F., Schmidt, A. A., Mulvihill, J. J., Frederiksen, K., Tawn, E. J., Stovall, M., Johansen, C., Boice, J. D., & Winther, J. F. (2018). Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark. National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online), 110(5), 534-538. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djx248

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Nielsen, Betina Frydenlund ; Schmidt, Anne Aarslev ; Mulvihill, John J ; Frederiksen, Kirsten ; Tawn, E Janet ; Stovall, Marilyn ; Johansen, Christoffer ; Boice, John D ; Winther, Jeanette Falck. / Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors : A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark. I: National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online). 2018 ; Bind 110, Nr. 5. s. 534-538.

Bibtex

@article{a9561d323d2e4cefa841a7abd767ae62,
title = "Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark",
abstract = "To examine whether cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 years are more likely to have offspring with chromosomal abnormalities than their siblings, chromosomal abnormalities were determined in a population-based cohort of 14 611 offspring (14 580 live-born children and 31 fetuses) of 8945 Danish cancer survivors and 40 859 offspring (40 794 live-born children and 65 fetuses) of 19 536 siblings. Chromosomal abnormalities include numeric and structural abnormalities. Odds ratios were estimated by multiple logistic regression models comparing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring with that in siblings' offspring. In a subgroup of survivors with gonadal radiation doses (mean = 0.95 Gy for males and 0.91 Gy for females), no indication of a dose response was found. Overall, no increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring was observed compared with their siblings' offspring (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 1.44, two-sided P = .94), with similar risk between male and female survivors. Cancer survivors were not more likely than their siblings to have children with a chromosomal abnormality.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Nielsen, {Betina Frydenlund} and Schmidt, {Anne Aarslev} and Mulvihill, {John J} and Kirsten Frederiksen and Tawn, {E Janet} and Marilyn Stovall and Christoffer Johansen and Boice, {John D} and Winther, {Jeanette Falck}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1093/jnci/djx248",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "534--538",
journal = "National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)",
issn = "1460-2105",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors

T2 - A Population-Based Cohort Study in Denmark

AU - Nielsen, Betina Frydenlund

AU - Schmidt, Anne Aarslev

AU - Mulvihill, John J

AU - Frederiksen, Kirsten

AU - Tawn, E Janet

AU - Stovall, Marilyn

AU - Johansen, Christoffer

AU - Boice, John D

AU - Winther, Jeanette Falck

N1 - © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - To examine whether cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 years are more likely to have offspring with chromosomal abnormalities than their siblings, chromosomal abnormalities were determined in a population-based cohort of 14 611 offspring (14 580 live-born children and 31 fetuses) of 8945 Danish cancer survivors and 40 859 offspring (40 794 live-born children and 65 fetuses) of 19 536 siblings. Chromosomal abnormalities include numeric and structural abnormalities. Odds ratios were estimated by multiple logistic regression models comparing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring with that in siblings' offspring. In a subgroup of survivors with gonadal radiation doses (mean = 0.95 Gy for males and 0.91 Gy for females), no indication of a dose response was found. Overall, no increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring was observed compared with their siblings' offspring (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 1.44, two-sided P = .94), with similar risk between male and female survivors. Cancer survivors were not more likely than their siblings to have children with a chromosomal abnormality.

AB - To examine whether cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 years are more likely to have offspring with chromosomal abnormalities than their siblings, chromosomal abnormalities were determined in a population-based cohort of 14 611 offspring (14 580 live-born children and 31 fetuses) of 8945 Danish cancer survivors and 40 859 offspring (40 794 live-born children and 65 fetuses) of 19 536 siblings. Chromosomal abnormalities include numeric and structural abnormalities. Odds ratios were estimated by multiple logistic regression models comparing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring with that in siblings' offspring. In a subgroup of survivors with gonadal radiation doses (mean = 0.95 Gy for males and 0.91 Gy for females), no indication of a dose response was found. Overall, no increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities among survivors' offspring was observed compared with their siblings' offspring (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 1.44, two-sided P = .94), with similar risk between male and female survivors. Cancer survivors were not more likely than their siblings to have children with a chromosomal abnormality.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1093/jnci/djx248

DO - 10.1093/jnci/djx248

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29228263

VL - 110

SP - 534

EP - 538

JO - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)

JF - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)

SN - 1460-2105

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 52146209