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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Cholecystokinin and panic disorder: reflections on the history and some unsolved questions

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

The classic gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) and its CCK2-receptor are expressed in almost all regions of the brain. This widespread expression makes CCK by far the most abundant peptidergic transmitter system in the brain. This CNS-ubiquity has, however, complicated the delineation of the roles of CCK peptides in normal brain functions and neuropsychiatric diseases. Nevertheless, the common panic disorder disease is apparently associated with CCK in the brain. Thus, the C-terminal tetrapeptide fragment of CCK (CCK-4) induces, by intravenous administration in a dose-related manner, panic attacks that are similar to the endogenous attacks in panic disorder patients. This review describes the history behind the discovery of the panicogenic effect of CCK-4. Subsequently, the review discusses three unsettled questions about the involvement of cerebral CCK in the pathogenesis of anxiety and panic disorder, including therapeutic attempts with CCK2-receptor antagonists.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer5657
TidsskriftMolecules
Vol/bind26
Udgave nummer18
ISSN1420-3049
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 17 sep. 2021

ID: 68616779