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Cervical spinal cord injury after blunt assault: Just a pain in the neck?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) after blunt assault.

METHODS: The ACS National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) 2012 Research Data Set was used to identify victims of blunt assault using the ICD-9 E-codes 960.0, 968.2, 973. ICD-9 codes 805.00, 839.00, 806.00, 952.00 identified cervical vertebral fractures/dislocations and CSCI. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of CSCI.

RESULTS: 14,835 (2%) out of 833,311 NTDB cases were blunt assault victims and thus included. 217 (1%) had cervical vertebral fracture/dislocation without CSCI; 57 (0.4%) had CSCI. Age ≥55 years was independently predictive of CSCI; assault by striking/thrown object, facial fracture, and intracranial injury predicted the absence of CSCI. 25 (0.02%) patients with CSCI underwent cervical spinal fusion.

CONCLUSIONS: CSCI is rare after blunt assault. While the odds of CSCI increase with age, facial fracture or intracranial injury predicts the absence of CSCI.

SUMMARY: The incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) after blunt assault was investigated. 14,835 blunt assault victims were identified; 217 had cervical vertebral fracture/dislocation without CSCI; 57 had CSCI. Age ≥55 years was found to independently predict CSCI, while assault by striking/thrown object, facial fracture, and intracranial injury predicted the absence of CSCI.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Surgery
Vol/bind217
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)648-652
Antal sider5
ISSN0002-9610
DOI
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2019

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

ID: 56966998