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Case series on the Charcot neuroarthropathy in hands after cervical central cord syndrome

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@article{061f7cf752154e5c9ac27f338edd6354,
title = "Case series on the Charcot neuroarthropathy in hands after cervical central cord syndrome",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Charcot neuroarthropathy (CNA) of the upper extremity occurs most frequently in shoulders. However, CNA in the hands is uncommon and seldom be reported. The onset of CNA is usually insidious. If this process continues undetected, it can result in joint deformity, ulceration and/or superinfection, loss of function, and amputation or even death. In this article, we are going to present three cases of CNA in the hands of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with central cord syndrome.CASE PRESENTATION: Three male individuals with cervical spinal stenosis contracted tetraplegia (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale Grade D, D, and B) due to spinal cord contusion after a trauma and developed hand swelling without pain 2 to 3 months after their SCI. X-ray showed degenerative joint changes in the hands. CNA was considered due to the patient's history of cervical SCI, loss of motor function and sensation, symptoms of painless swelling, physical examination, and X-ray findings. The self-care sub scores of Spinal Cord Independence Measure III improved slightly only during rehabilitation and follow-up due to poor hand function.CONCLUSIONS: CNA may develop after a central or peripheral neurological disorder. Nearly every joint of the body can be affected and the lower limbs are the most frequently involved. However, CNA of the hand is rare. We present three patients with CNA in the hands after cervical SCI and review the features and early differential diagnosis of CNA. Currently there is no specific treatment available. Therefore, early identification of CNA and adequate protection to the affected joints seem important.",
keywords = "Central Cord Syndrome/complications, Humans, Male, Neck Injuries, Quadriplegia/diagnostic imaging, Recovery of Function, Spinal Cord Injuries/complications, Upper Extremity",
author = "Wenting Wang and Anni Tong and Nan Liu and Fin Biering-S{\o}rensen and Shuai Tong",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2022. The Author(s).",
year = "2022",
month = jun,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1186/s12891-022-05502-7",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "545",
journal = "BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders",
issn = "1471-2474",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Case series on the Charcot neuroarthropathy in hands after cervical central cord syndrome

AU - Wang, Wenting

AU - Tong, Anni

AU - Liu, Nan

AU - Biering-Sørensen, Fin

AU - Tong, Shuai

N1 - © 2022. The Author(s).

PY - 2022/6/6

Y1 - 2022/6/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Charcot neuroarthropathy (CNA) of the upper extremity occurs most frequently in shoulders. However, CNA in the hands is uncommon and seldom be reported. The onset of CNA is usually insidious. If this process continues undetected, it can result in joint deformity, ulceration and/or superinfection, loss of function, and amputation or even death. In this article, we are going to present three cases of CNA in the hands of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with central cord syndrome.CASE PRESENTATION: Three male individuals with cervical spinal stenosis contracted tetraplegia (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale Grade D, D, and B) due to spinal cord contusion after a trauma and developed hand swelling without pain 2 to 3 months after their SCI. X-ray showed degenerative joint changes in the hands. CNA was considered due to the patient's history of cervical SCI, loss of motor function and sensation, symptoms of painless swelling, physical examination, and X-ray findings. The self-care sub scores of Spinal Cord Independence Measure III improved slightly only during rehabilitation and follow-up due to poor hand function.CONCLUSIONS: CNA may develop after a central or peripheral neurological disorder. Nearly every joint of the body can be affected and the lower limbs are the most frequently involved. However, CNA of the hand is rare. We present three patients with CNA in the hands after cervical SCI and review the features and early differential diagnosis of CNA. Currently there is no specific treatment available. Therefore, early identification of CNA and adequate protection to the affected joints seem important.

AB - BACKGROUND: Charcot neuroarthropathy (CNA) of the upper extremity occurs most frequently in shoulders. However, CNA in the hands is uncommon and seldom be reported. The onset of CNA is usually insidious. If this process continues undetected, it can result in joint deformity, ulceration and/or superinfection, loss of function, and amputation or even death. In this article, we are going to present three cases of CNA in the hands of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with central cord syndrome.CASE PRESENTATION: Three male individuals with cervical spinal stenosis contracted tetraplegia (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale Grade D, D, and B) due to spinal cord contusion after a trauma and developed hand swelling without pain 2 to 3 months after their SCI. X-ray showed degenerative joint changes in the hands. CNA was considered due to the patient's history of cervical SCI, loss of motor function and sensation, symptoms of painless swelling, physical examination, and X-ray findings. The self-care sub scores of Spinal Cord Independence Measure III improved slightly only during rehabilitation and follow-up due to poor hand function.CONCLUSIONS: CNA may develop after a central or peripheral neurological disorder. Nearly every joint of the body can be affected and the lower limbs are the most frequently involved. However, CNA of the hand is rare. We present three patients with CNA in the hands after cervical SCI and review the features and early differential diagnosis of CNA. Currently there is no specific treatment available. Therefore, early identification of CNA and adequate protection to the affected joints seem important.

KW - Central Cord Syndrome/complications

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Neck Injuries

KW - Quadriplegia/diagnostic imaging

KW - Recovery of Function

KW - Spinal Cord Injuries/complications

KW - Upper Extremity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85131347736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12891-022-05502-7

DO - 10.1186/s12891-022-05502-7

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 35668418

VL - 23

SP - 545

JO - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

JF - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

SN - 1471-2474

IS - 1

M1 - 545

ER -

ID: 78440285