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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Can readmission after stroke be prevented? Results of a randomized clinical study: a postdischarge follow-up service for stroke survivors

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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: About 50% of stroke survivors are discharged to their homes with lasting disability. Knowledge, however, of the importance of follow-up services that targets these patients is sparse. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate 2 models of follow-up intervention after discharge. The study hypothesis was that intervention could reduce readmission rates and institutionalization and prevent functional decline. We report the results regarding readmission.

METHODS: This randomized study included 155 stroke patients with persistent impairment and disability who, after the completion of inpatient rehabilitation, were discharged to their homes. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 follow-up interventions provided in addition to standard care or to standard aftercare. Fifty-four received follow-up home visits by a physician (INT1-HVP), 53 were provided instructions by a physiotherapist in their home (INT2-PI), and 48 received standard aftercare only (controls). Baseline characteristics for the 3 groups were comparable. Six months after discharge, data were obtained on readmission and institutionalization.

RESULTS: The readmission rates within 6 months after discharge were significantly lower in the intervention groups than in the control group (INT1-HVP 26%, INT2-PI 34%, controls 44%; P=0.028). Multivariate analysis of readmission risk showed a significant favorable effect of intervention (INT1-HVP or INT2-PI) in interaction with length of hospital stay (P=0.0332), indicating that the effect of intervention was strongest for patients with a prolonged inpatient rehabilitation.

CONCLUSIONS: Readmission is common among disabled stroke survivors. Follow-up intervention after discharge seems to be a way of preventing readmission, especially for patients with long inpatient rehabilitation.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftStroke
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1038-45
Antal sider8
ISSN0039-2499
StatusUdgivet - maj 2000

ID: 53972139