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Breaking potentially bad news of cancer workup to well-informed patients by telephone versus in-person: A randomised controlled trial on psychosocial consequences

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  • Uffe Bodtger
  • Kristoffer Marsaa
  • Volkert Siersma
  • Christine Winther Bang
  • Asbjørn Høegholm
  • John Brodersen
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BACKGROUND: The use of telephone in delivering cancer care increases, but not in cancer workup. Current protocols for breaking bad news assume a single in-person meeting. Cancer workup involves multiple opportunities for patient information. We investigated the psychosocial consequences in gradually informed patients of receiving lung cancer workup results by telephone versus in-person.

METHODS: A randomised, controlled, open-label, assessor-blinded, single-centre trial including patients referred for invasive workup for suspected malignancy (clinical trials no. NCT04315207). Patients were informed on probable cancer at referral, after imaging, and on the day of invasive workup (Baseline visit). Primary endpoint: change (Δ) from baseline to follow-up (4 weeks after receiving workup results) in scores of a validated, sensitive, condition-specific questionnaire (COS-LC) assessing consequences on anxiety, behaviour, dejection and sleep.

RESULTS: Of 492 eligible patients, we randomised 255 patients (mean age: 68 years; female: 38%; malignancy diagnosed: 68%) to the telephone (n = 129) or in-person (n = 126) group. Groups were comparable at baseline and follow-up, and no between-groups difference in ΔCOS-LC was observed in the intention-to-treat population, or in subgroups diagnosed with or without malignancy.

CONCLUSION: Breaking final result of cancer workup by telephone is not associated with adverse psychosocial consequences compared to in-person conversation in well-informed patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere13435
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Vol/bind30
Udgave nummer5
ISSN0961-5423
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2021

Bibliografisk note

© 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

ID: 71196544