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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Body Mass Index, Triglycerides, and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-Based Study of 118 000 Individuals

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OBJECTIVE: The incidence of acute pancreatitis is rising worldwide and currently no curative treatment exists. Clarification of preventable risk factors is important for the reduction of morbidity and mortality from acute pancreatitis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with body mass index (BMI) is partly mediated through elevated triglycerides.

DESIGN: We included 118 085 individuals from 2 prospective cohort studies, the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study, with BMI measured at baseline. Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was assessed from the national Danish registries, as hospitalization or death due to acute pancreatitis.

RESULTS: Higher BMI was associated with higher risk of acute pancreatitis with a multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.8) for BMI of 25-29.9, 2.1 (1.6-2.9) for BMI of 30-34.9, and 2.8 (1.8-4.3) for BMI > 35, compared with individuals with BMI of 18.5-24.9. Triglycerides mediated 29% (95% CI, 12%-46%; P = 0.001) of the association between BMI and risk of acute pancreatitis in the age- and sex-adjusted model and 22% (6%-39%; P = 0.008) in the multivariable-adjusted model.

CONCLUSION: Higher BMI is associated with higher risk of acute pancreatitis in individuals from the general population, partly mediated through higher triglycerides. This indicates a potential for preventing acute pancreatitis by reducing BMI and triglycerides in individuals with high values.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Vol/bind105
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)163-174
Antal sider12
ISSN0021-972X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 jan. 2020

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, Denmark; the Independent Research Fund Denmark; Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Chief Physician Johan Boserup and Lise Boserup's Fund, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study were supported by the Danish Heart Foundation, the Danish Medical Research Council, the Copenhagen County Foundation, and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital.

ID: 59307876