Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Body Mass Index, Triglycerides, and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-Based Study of 118 000 Individuals

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. TMAO: Trimethylamine-N-Oxide or Time to Minimize Intake of Animal Products?

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Longitudinal Increases in Serum Insulin-like Factor 3 and Testosterone Determined by LC-MS/MS in Pubertal Danish Boys

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Marked increase in incident gynecomastia: a 20-year national registry study, 1998 to 2017

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Marked Increase in Incident Gynecomastia: A 20-Year National Registry Study, 1998 to 2017

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Oral D/L-3-Hydroxybutyrate stimulates cholecystokinin and insulin secretion and slows gastric emptying in healthy males

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Cardiac chamber volumes and left ventricular mass in people living with HIV and matched uninfected controls

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Impact of cardiovascular risk factors and genetics on 10-year absolute risk of dementia: risk charts for targeted prevention

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

OBJECTIVE: The incidence of acute pancreatitis is rising worldwide and currently no curative treatment exists. Clarification of preventable risk factors is important for the reduction of morbidity and mortality from acute pancreatitis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with body mass index (BMI) is partly mediated through elevated triglycerides.

DESIGN: We included 118 085 individuals from 2 prospective cohort studies, the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study, with BMI measured at baseline. Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was assessed from the national Danish registries, as hospitalization or death due to acute pancreatitis.

RESULTS: Higher BMI was associated with higher risk of acute pancreatitis with a multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.8) for BMI of 25-29.9, 2.1 (1.6-2.9) for BMI of 30-34.9, and 2.8 (1.8-4.3) for BMI > 35, compared with individuals with BMI of 18.5-24.9. Triglycerides mediated 29% (95% CI, 12%-46%; P = 0.001) of the association between BMI and risk of acute pancreatitis in the age- and sex-adjusted model and 22% (6%-39%; P = 0.008) in the multivariable-adjusted model.

CONCLUSION: Higher BMI is associated with higher risk of acute pancreatitis in individuals from the general population, partly mediated through higher triglycerides. This indicates a potential for preventing acute pancreatitis by reducing BMI and triglycerides in individuals with high values.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Vol/bind105
Udgave nummer1
ISSN0021-972X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 jan. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© Endocrine Society 2019. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

ID: 59307876