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Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis

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@article{cf6b3b33a5c145ed98fd5f1c785b67f8,
title = "Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis",
abstract = "Background: Body size in adult life is likely associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis, yet little is known about associations with body size earlier in life.Aim: To examine whether birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and height are associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis.Subjects and methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 171,447 girls born 1930-1996, with measured weights and heights at ages 7-13 were included. Outcomes were obtained from health registers. Cox regressions were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI).Results: During follow-up, 2149 endometriosis cases and 1410 adenomyosis cases were diagnosed. Childhood BMI was inversely associated with endometriosis (HR = 0.92 [95{\%} CI: 0.88-0.96] per z-score at age 7). In contrast, childhood height was positively associated with endometriosis (HR = 1.09 [95{\%} CI: 1.05-1.14] per z-score at age 7). Associations with childhood body size did not differ by endometriosis location. Childhood BMI and height had limited associations with adenomyosis. Birth weight was not associated with endometriosis or adenomyosis.Conclusion: Lean and tall girls are more often diagnosed with endometriosis, but not adenomyosis. These findings suggest that indicators of endometriosis risk are already apparent at early ages.",
keywords = "(MeSH) adenomyosis, birth weight, body weights and measures, child, endometriosis",
author = "Julie Aarestrup and Jensen, {Britt W} and Ulrich, {Lian G} and Dorthe Hartwell and Britton Trabert and Baker, {Jennifer L}",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1080/03014460.2020.1727011",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "173--180",
journal = "Annals of Human Biology",
issn = "0301-4460",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis

AU - Aarestrup, Julie

AU - Jensen, Britt W

AU - Ulrich, Lian G

AU - Hartwell, Dorthe

AU - Trabert, Britton

AU - Baker, Jennifer L

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Background: Body size in adult life is likely associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis, yet little is known about associations with body size earlier in life.Aim: To examine whether birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and height are associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis.Subjects and methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 171,447 girls born 1930-1996, with measured weights and heights at ages 7-13 were included. Outcomes were obtained from health registers. Cox regressions were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: During follow-up, 2149 endometriosis cases and 1410 adenomyosis cases were diagnosed. Childhood BMI was inversely associated with endometriosis (HR = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.88-0.96] per z-score at age 7). In contrast, childhood height was positively associated with endometriosis (HR = 1.09 [95% CI: 1.05-1.14] per z-score at age 7). Associations with childhood body size did not differ by endometriosis location. Childhood BMI and height had limited associations with adenomyosis. Birth weight was not associated with endometriosis or adenomyosis.Conclusion: Lean and tall girls are more often diagnosed with endometriosis, but not adenomyosis. These findings suggest that indicators of endometriosis risk are already apparent at early ages.

AB - Background: Body size in adult life is likely associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis, yet little is known about associations with body size earlier in life.Aim: To examine whether birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and height are associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis.Subjects and methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 171,447 girls born 1930-1996, with measured weights and heights at ages 7-13 were included. Outcomes were obtained from health registers. Cox regressions were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: During follow-up, 2149 endometriosis cases and 1410 adenomyosis cases were diagnosed. Childhood BMI was inversely associated with endometriosis (HR = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.88-0.96] per z-score at age 7). In contrast, childhood height was positively associated with endometriosis (HR = 1.09 [95% CI: 1.05-1.14] per z-score at age 7). Associations with childhood body size did not differ by endometriosis location. Childhood BMI and height had limited associations with adenomyosis. Birth weight was not associated with endometriosis or adenomyosis.Conclusion: Lean and tall girls are more often diagnosed with endometriosis, but not adenomyosis. These findings suggest that indicators of endometriosis risk are already apparent at early ages.

KW - (MeSH) adenomyosis

KW - birth weight

KW - body weights and measures

KW - child

KW - endometriosis

U2 - 10.1080/03014460.2020.1727011

DO - 10.1080/03014460.2020.1727011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

SP - 173

EP - 180

JO - Annals of Human Biology

JF - Annals of Human Biology

SN - 0301-4460

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 59633003