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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis

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Vis graf over relationer

Background: Body size in adult life is likely associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis, yet little is known about associations with body size earlier in life.Aim: To examine whether birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and height are associated with risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis.Subjects and methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 171,447 girls born 1930-1996, with measured weights and heights at ages 7-13 were included. Outcomes were obtained from health registers. Cox regressions were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: During follow-up, 2149 endometriosis cases and 1410 adenomyosis cases were diagnosed. Childhood BMI was inversely associated with endometriosis (HR = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.88-0.96] per z-score at age 7). In contrast, childhood height was positively associated with endometriosis (HR = 1.09 [95% CI: 1.05-1.14] per z-score at age 7). Associations with childhood body size did not differ by endometriosis location. Childhood BMI and height had limited associations with adenomyosis. Birth weight was not associated with endometriosis or adenomyosis.Conclusion: Lean and tall girls are more often diagnosed with endometriosis, but not adenomyosis. These findings suggest that indicators of endometriosis risk are already apparent at early ages.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAnnals of Human Biology
Vol/bind47
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)173-180
Antal sider8
ISSN0301-4460
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2020

ID: 59633003