Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Autism comorbidities show elevated female-to-male odds ratios and are associated with the age of first autism diagnosis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Number of Traumatic brain injuries and temporal associations with depression: A register-based cohort study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Structural brain abnormalities associated with cognitive impairments in bipolar disorder

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Severe mental illness is associated with increased mortality and severe course of COVID-19

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Reducing the rate of psychiatric Re-ADMISsions in Bipolar Disorder using smartphones The RADMIS trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Clozapine and mortality: A comparison with other antipsychotics in a nationwide Danish cohort study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Emotional cognition subgroups in mood disorders: Associations with familial risk

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Structural brain abnormalities associated with cognitive impairments in bipolar disorder

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the comorbidity rates in autism and sex, birth year and the age at which autism was first diagnosed and compare the relative impact of each.

METHOD: Using the Danish National Patient Registry, cumulative incidences up to the age of 16 for 11 comorbid conditions (psychosis, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, tic disorders, sleep disorders or intellectual disability) were calculated for individuals with autism (N = 16,126) and non-autism individuals (N = 654,977). Individuals were further stratified based on the age at the first autism diagnoses and comorbid diagnoses up to the age of 16 were compared.

RESULTS: Most comorbidities were significantly associated with birth year and sex. Female/male odds ratios for 8 of 11 comorbid conditions were up to 67% higher than the corresponding odds ratios in the non-autism population, including conditions that are generally more common in males than in females as well as conditions that are more common in females. All comorbidity rates were significantly associated with the age at the first autism diagnosis, which was a stronger predictor than sex and birth year for 8 conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidity rates for females exceed what would be expected based on the sex ratios among non-autistic individuals, indicating that the association between autism and comorbidity is stronger in females. Comorbidity rates are also highly dependent on the age at the first autism diagnosis, which may contribute to autism heterogeneity in research and clinical practice.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Vol/bind144
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)475-486
Antal sider12
ISSN0001-690X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2021

ID: 67031325