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Auditory sensory gating in young adolescents with early-onset psychosis: a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

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@article{0a1accba32774316be6c5a1cfaf2082d,
title = "Auditory sensory gating in young adolescents with early-onset psychosis: a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "Numerous studies have demonstrated impaired sensory gating in schizophrenia and this impairment has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for the disorder. The typical age of onset for schizophrenia is early adulthood, however a sizable group of patients present with psychotic symptoms before the age of 18, commonly referred to as early-onset psychosis (EOP). How an earlier onset influences sensory gating is currently unknown. Impaired sensory gating may not be specific to psychosis, but rather a shared disturbance of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Therefore, the current study investigated P50 suppression in young adolescents (12-17 years old) with either EOP (N = 55) or ADHD (N = 28) and age and gender matched healthy controls (HC) (N = 71). In addition to P50 suppression, N100 and P200 suppression data were also analyzed. No significant group differences in either raw mean P50 amplitude or mean P50 gating ratios were observed between EOP, ADHD, and HC. Additionally, we observed no P50 suppression deficit in those EOP patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 39). Similarly, we observed no differences in N100 or P200 between the three groups. Healthy levels of P50 suppression were found in both patient groups. The results are in line with some previous studies showing healthy levels of P50 suppression in the early phases of schizophrenia. Our findings do not support P50 sensory gating as a valid biomarker for EOP or ADHD.",
author = "Cecilie Lemvigh and Jepsen, {Jens Richardt M{\o}llegaard} and Birgitte Fagerlund and Pagsberg, {Anne Katrine} and Glenth{\o}j, {Birte Yding} and Jacob Rydkj{\ae}r and Bob Oranje",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1038/s41386-019-0555-9",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "649--655",
journal = "Neuropsychopharmacology",
issn = "0893-133X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Auditory sensory gating in young adolescents with early-onset psychosis: a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

T2 - a comparison with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

AU - Lemvigh, Cecilie

AU - Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard

AU - Fagerlund, Birgitte

AU - Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

AU - Glenthøj, Birte Yding

AU - Rydkjær, Jacob

AU - Oranje, Bob

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Numerous studies have demonstrated impaired sensory gating in schizophrenia and this impairment has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for the disorder. The typical age of onset for schizophrenia is early adulthood, however a sizable group of patients present with psychotic symptoms before the age of 18, commonly referred to as early-onset psychosis (EOP). How an earlier onset influences sensory gating is currently unknown. Impaired sensory gating may not be specific to psychosis, but rather a shared disturbance of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Therefore, the current study investigated P50 suppression in young adolescents (12-17 years old) with either EOP (N = 55) or ADHD (N = 28) and age and gender matched healthy controls (HC) (N = 71). In addition to P50 suppression, N100 and P200 suppression data were also analyzed. No significant group differences in either raw mean P50 amplitude or mean P50 gating ratios were observed between EOP, ADHD, and HC. Additionally, we observed no P50 suppression deficit in those EOP patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 39). Similarly, we observed no differences in N100 or P200 between the three groups. Healthy levels of P50 suppression were found in both patient groups. The results are in line with some previous studies showing healthy levels of P50 suppression in the early phases of schizophrenia. Our findings do not support P50 sensory gating as a valid biomarker for EOP or ADHD.

AB - Numerous studies have demonstrated impaired sensory gating in schizophrenia and this impairment has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for the disorder. The typical age of onset for schizophrenia is early adulthood, however a sizable group of patients present with psychotic symptoms before the age of 18, commonly referred to as early-onset psychosis (EOP). How an earlier onset influences sensory gating is currently unknown. Impaired sensory gating may not be specific to psychosis, but rather a shared disturbance of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Therefore, the current study investigated P50 suppression in young adolescents (12-17 years old) with either EOP (N = 55) or ADHD (N = 28) and age and gender matched healthy controls (HC) (N = 71). In addition to P50 suppression, N100 and P200 suppression data were also analyzed. No significant group differences in either raw mean P50 amplitude or mean P50 gating ratios were observed between EOP, ADHD, and HC. Additionally, we observed no P50 suppression deficit in those EOP patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 39). Similarly, we observed no differences in N100 or P200 between the three groups. Healthy levels of P50 suppression were found in both patient groups. The results are in line with some previous studies showing healthy levels of P50 suppression in the early phases of schizophrenia. Our findings do not support P50 sensory gating as a valid biomarker for EOP or ADHD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074731935&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41386-019-0555-9

DO - 10.1038/s41386-019-0555-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 649

EP - 655

JO - Neuropsychopharmacology

JF - Neuropsychopharmacology

SN - 0893-133X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 58217194