Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Associations of maternal birth weight, childhood height, body mass index and change in height and body mass index from childhood to pregnancy with risks of preterm delivery

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Matrix structure of dairy products results in different postprandial lipid responses: a randomized crossover trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Habitual flavonoid intake and ischemic stroke incidence in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Prior undernutrition and insulin production several years later in Tanzanian adults

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Liraglutide after diet-induced weight loss for pain and weight control in knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Instrumental variable analysis using offspring BMI in childhood as an indicator of parental BMI in relation to mortality

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Association of Childhood Fat Mass and Weight With Adult-Onset Type 2 Diabetes in Denmark

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Tre bud på hvordan vi kommer børn og unges overvægt til livs

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftBidrag til avis - KronikFormidling

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: It remains unknown whether maternal early life body size and change in height and BMI from childhood to pregnancy are associated with her risk of having a preterm delivery.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether a woman's birth weight, childhood height, BMI and changes in height and BMI from childhood to pregnancy were associated with preterm delivery.

METHODS: We studied 47,947 nulliparous women born 1940-1996 from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register with information on birth weight and measured childhood heights and weights at ages 7 and/or 13 y. Gestational age was obtained from the Danish Birth Register as was pre-pregnancy BMI for 13,114 women. Deliveries were classified as very (22- < 32 wk) or moderate (32- < 37 wk) preterm. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using binomial regression.

RESULTS: A woman's birth weight and childhood height were inversely associated with very and moderate preterm delivery. Childhood BMI had U-shaped associations only with very preterm delivery; at age 7 y, compared to a BMI z score of 0, the RRs were 1.31 (1.11, 1.54) for a z score of -1 and 1.18 (1.01, 1.38) for a z score of +1. Short stature in childhood and adulthood was associated with higher risks of very and moderate preterm delivery. Changing from a BMI at the 85th percentile at 7 y (US CDC reference) to a pre-pregnancy BMI of 22.5 kg/m2 was associated with RRs of 1.12 (0.91, 1.37) and 0.88 (0.78, 0.99) for very and moderate preterm delivery, respectively, compared to a reference woman (50th percentile at 7 y, 22.5 kg/m2 pre-pregnancy BMI).

CONCLUSIONS: Maternal birth weight, childhood height and BMI are associated with very and moderate preterm delivery, although in different patterns. Consistent short stature is associated with very and moderate preterm delivery, whereas normalizing BMI from childhood to pregnancy may reduce risks of very preterm delivery.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe American journal of clinical nutrition
ISSN0002-9165
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 27 dec. 2021

Bibliografisk note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition.

ID: 70536001