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Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases

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Harvard

Nyberg, ST, Singh-Manoux, A, Pentti, J, Madsen, IEH, Sabia, S, Alfredsson, L, Bjorner, JB, Borritz, M, Burr, H, Goldberg, M, Heikkilä, K, Jokela, M, Knutsson, A, Lallukka, T, Lindbohm, JV, Nielsen, ML, Nordin, M, Oksanen, T, Pejtersen, JH, Rahkonen, O, Rugulies, R, Shipley, MJ, Sipilä, PN, Stenholm, S, Suominen, S, Vahtera, J, Virtanen, M, Westerlund, H, Zins, M, Hamer, M, Batty, GD & Kivimäki, M 2020, 'Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases', JAMA Internal Medicine, bind 180, nr. 5, s. 760-768. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

APA

Nyberg, S. T., Singh-Manoux, A., Pentti, J., Madsen, I. E. H., Sabia, S., Alfredsson, L., Bjorner, J. B., Borritz, M., Burr, H., Goldberg, M., Heikkilä, K., Jokela, M., Knutsson, A., Lallukka, T., Lindbohm, J. V., Nielsen, M. L., Nordin, M., Oksanen, T., Pejtersen, J. H., ... Kivimäki, M. (2020). Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases. JAMA Internal Medicine, 180(5), 760-768. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

CBE

Nyberg ST, Singh-Manoux A, Pentti J, Madsen IEH, Sabia S, Alfredsson L, Bjorner JB, Borritz M, Burr H, Goldberg M, Heikkilä K, Jokela M, Knutsson A, Lallukka T, Lindbohm JV, Nielsen ML, Nordin M, Oksanen T, Pejtersen JH, Rahkonen O, Rugulies R, Shipley MJ, Sipilä PN, Stenholm S, Suominen S, Vahtera J, Virtanen M, Westerlund H, Zins M, Hamer M, Batty GD, Kivimäki M. 2020. Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases. JAMA Internal Medicine. 180(5):760-768. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

MLA

Vancouver

Nyberg ST, Singh-Manoux A, Pentti J, Madsen IEH, Sabia S, Alfredsson L o.a. Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2020 maj 1;180(5):760-768. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

Author

Nyberg, Solja T ; Singh-Manoux, Archana ; Pentti, Jaana ; Madsen, Ida E H ; Sabia, Severine ; Alfredsson, Lars ; Bjorner, Jakob B ; Borritz, Marianne ; Burr, Hermann ; Goldberg, Marcel ; Heikkilä, Katriina ; Jokela, Markus ; Knutsson, Anders ; Lallukka, Tea ; Lindbohm, Joni V ; Nielsen, Martin L ; Nordin, Maria ; Oksanen, Tuula ; Pejtersen, Jan H ; Rahkonen, Ossi ; Rugulies, Reiner ; Shipley, Martin J ; Sipilä, Pyry N ; Stenholm, Sari ; Suominen, Sakari ; Vahtera, Jussi ; Virtanen, Marianna ; Westerlund, Hugo ; Zins, Marie ; Hamer, Mark ; Batty, G David ; Kivimäki, Mika. / Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases. I: JAMA Internal Medicine. 2020 ; Bind 180, Nr. 5. s. 760-768.

Bibtex

@article{cb4adc58ebc14ed880ad529bcd763c17,
title = "Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases",
abstract = "Importance: It is well established that selected lifestyle factors are individually associated with lower risk of chronic diseases, but how combinations of these factors are associated with disease-free life-years is unknown.Objective: To estimate the association between healthy lifestyle and the number of disease-free life-years.Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective multicohort study, including 12 European studies as part of the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium, was performed. Participants included 116 043 people free of major noncommunicable disease at baseline from August 7, 1991, to May 31, 2006. Data analysis was conducted from May 22, 2018, to January 21, 2020.Exposures: Four baseline lifestyle factors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were each allocated a score based on risk status: optimal (2 points), intermediate (1 point), or poor (0 points) resulting in an aggregated lifestyle score ranging from 0 (worst) to 8 (best). Sixteen lifestyle profiles were constructed from combinations of these risk factors.Main Outcomes and Measures: The number of years between ages 40 and 75 years without chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Results: Of the 116 043 people included in the analysis, the mean (SD) age was 43.7 (10.1) years and 70 911 were women (61.1%). During 1.45 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up, 12.5 years; range, 4.9-18.6 years), 17 383 participants developed at least 1 chronic disease. There was a linear association between overall healthy lifestyle score and the number of disease-free years, such that a 1-point improvement in the score was associated with an increase of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.83-1.08) disease-free years in men and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.75-1.02) years in women. Comparing the best lifestyle score with the worst lifestyle score was associated with 9.9 (95% CI 6.7-13.1) additional years without chronic diseases in men and 9.4 (95% CI 5.4-13.3) additional years in women (P < .001 for dose-response). All of the 4 lifestyle profiles that were associated with the highest number of disease-free years included a body-mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and at least 2 of the following factors: never smoking, physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption. Participants with 1 of these lifestyle profiles reached age 70.3 (95% CI, 69.9-70.8) to 71.4 (95% CI, 70.9-72.0) years disease free depending on the profile and sex.Conclusions and Relevance: In this multicohort analysis, various healthy lifestyle profiles appeared to be associated with gains in life-years without major chronic diseases.",
author = "Nyberg, {Solja T} and Archana Singh-Manoux and Jaana Pentti and Madsen, {Ida E H} and Severine Sabia and Lars Alfredsson and Bjorner, {Jakob B} and Marianne Borritz and Hermann Burr and Marcel Goldberg and Katriina Heikkil{\"a} and Markus Jokela and Anders Knutsson and Tea Lallukka and Lindbohm, {Joni V} and Nielsen, {Martin L} and Maria Nordin and Tuula Oksanen and Pejtersen, {Jan H} and Ossi Rahkonen and Reiner Rugulies and Shipley, {Martin J} and Sipil{\"a}, {Pyry N} and Sari Stenholm and Sakari Suominen and Jussi Vahtera and Marianna Virtanen and Hugo Westerlund and Marie Zins and Mark Hamer and Batty, {G David} and Mika Kivim{\"a}ki",
year = "2020",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618",
language = "English",
volume = "180",
pages = "760--768",
journal = "JAMA Internal Medicine",
issn = "2168-6106",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Healthy Lifestyle With Years Lived Without Major Chronic Diseases

AU - Nyberg, Solja T

AU - Singh-Manoux, Archana

AU - Pentti, Jaana

AU - Madsen, Ida E H

AU - Sabia, Severine

AU - Alfredsson, Lars

AU - Bjorner, Jakob B

AU - Borritz, Marianne

AU - Burr, Hermann

AU - Goldberg, Marcel

AU - Heikkilä, Katriina

AU - Jokela, Markus

AU - Knutsson, Anders

AU - Lallukka, Tea

AU - Lindbohm, Joni V

AU - Nielsen, Martin L

AU - Nordin, Maria

AU - Oksanen, Tuula

AU - Pejtersen, Jan H

AU - Rahkonen, Ossi

AU - Rugulies, Reiner

AU - Shipley, Martin J

AU - Sipilä, Pyry N

AU - Stenholm, Sari

AU - Suominen, Sakari

AU - Vahtera, Jussi

AU - Virtanen, Marianna

AU - Westerlund, Hugo

AU - Zins, Marie

AU - Hamer, Mark

AU - Batty, G David

AU - Kivimäki, Mika

PY - 2020/5/1

Y1 - 2020/5/1

N2 - Importance: It is well established that selected lifestyle factors are individually associated with lower risk of chronic diseases, but how combinations of these factors are associated with disease-free life-years is unknown.Objective: To estimate the association between healthy lifestyle and the number of disease-free life-years.Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective multicohort study, including 12 European studies as part of the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium, was performed. Participants included 116 043 people free of major noncommunicable disease at baseline from August 7, 1991, to May 31, 2006. Data analysis was conducted from May 22, 2018, to January 21, 2020.Exposures: Four baseline lifestyle factors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were each allocated a score based on risk status: optimal (2 points), intermediate (1 point), or poor (0 points) resulting in an aggregated lifestyle score ranging from 0 (worst) to 8 (best). Sixteen lifestyle profiles were constructed from combinations of these risk factors.Main Outcomes and Measures: The number of years between ages 40 and 75 years without chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Results: Of the 116 043 people included in the analysis, the mean (SD) age was 43.7 (10.1) years and 70 911 were women (61.1%). During 1.45 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up, 12.5 years; range, 4.9-18.6 years), 17 383 participants developed at least 1 chronic disease. There was a linear association between overall healthy lifestyle score and the number of disease-free years, such that a 1-point improvement in the score was associated with an increase of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.83-1.08) disease-free years in men and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.75-1.02) years in women. Comparing the best lifestyle score with the worst lifestyle score was associated with 9.9 (95% CI 6.7-13.1) additional years without chronic diseases in men and 9.4 (95% CI 5.4-13.3) additional years in women (P < .001 for dose-response). All of the 4 lifestyle profiles that were associated with the highest number of disease-free years included a body-mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and at least 2 of the following factors: never smoking, physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption. Participants with 1 of these lifestyle profiles reached age 70.3 (95% CI, 69.9-70.8) to 71.4 (95% CI, 70.9-72.0) years disease free depending on the profile and sex.Conclusions and Relevance: In this multicohort analysis, various healthy lifestyle profiles appeared to be associated with gains in life-years without major chronic diseases.

AB - Importance: It is well established that selected lifestyle factors are individually associated with lower risk of chronic diseases, but how combinations of these factors are associated with disease-free life-years is unknown.Objective: To estimate the association between healthy lifestyle and the number of disease-free life-years.Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective multicohort study, including 12 European studies as part of the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium, was performed. Participants included 116 043 people free of major noncommunicable disease at baseline from August 7, 1991, to May 31, 2006. Data analysis was conducted from May 22, 2018, to January 21, 2020.Exposures: Four baseline lifestyle factors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were each allocated a score based on risk status: optimal (2 points), intermediate (1 point), or poor (0 points) resulting in an aggregated lifestyle score ranging from 0 (worst) to 8 (best). Sixteen lifestyle profiles were constructed from combinations of these risk factors.Main Outcomes and Measures: The number of years between ages 40 and 75 years without chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Results: Of the 116 043 people included in the analysis, the mean (SD) age was 43.7 (10.1) years and 70 911 were women (61.1%). During 1.45 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up, 12.5 years; range, 4.9-18.6 years), 17 383 participants developed at least 1 chronic disease. There was a linear association between overall healthy lifestyle score and the number of disease-free years, such that a 1-point improvement in the score was associated with an increase of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.83-1.08) disease-free years in men and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.75-1.02) years in women. Comparing the best lifestyle score with the worst lifestyle score was associated with 9.9 (95% CI 6.7-13.1) additional years without chronic diseases in men and 9.4 (95% CI 5.4-13.3) additional years in women (P < .001 for dose-response). All of the 4 lifestyle profiles that were associated with the highest number of disease-free years included a body-mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and at least 2 of the following factors: never smoking, physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption. Participants with 1 of these lifestyle profiles reached age 70.3 (95% CI, 69.9-70.8) to 71.4 (95% CI, 70.9-72.0) years disease free depending on the profile and sex.Conclusions and Relevance: In this multicohort analysis, various healthy lifestyle profiles appeared to be associated with gains in life-years without major chronic diseases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85083251732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

DO - 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32250383

VL - 180

SP - 760

EP - 768

JO - JAMA Internal Medicine

JF - JAMA Internal Medicine

SN - 2168-6106

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 61532679