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Association Between Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise and the Risk of Stroke: Data From the Danish Nurse Cohort

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Bräuner, Elvira V. ; Jørgensen, Jeanette T. ; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine ; Backalarz, Claus ; Laursen, Jens E. ; Pedersen, Torben H. ; Simonsen, Mette K. ; Andersen, Zorana J. / Association Between Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise and the Risk of Stroke : Data From the Danish Nurse Cohort. I: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019 ; Bind 8, Nr. 14. s. e013157.

Bibtex

@article{e1649cf9be1e4bcc9fa886be97d878d7,
title = "Association Between Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise and the Risk of Stroke: Data From the Danish Nurse Cohort",
abstract = "Background Epidemiological studies suggest that road traffic noise increases the risk of stroke. Similar effects may be expected from wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure, but epidemiological evidence is lacking. The present study investigated the association between long-term exposure to WTN and the risk for stroke. Methods and Results First-ever stroke in 28 731 female nurses in the Danish Nurse Cohort was identified in the Danish National Patient register until the end of 2013. WTN, traffic noise, and air pollution exposures were estimated for all historic and present residential addresses between 1982 and 2013. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the associations between the 11-, 5-, and 1-year rolling means of WTN levels and stroke incidence. Of 23 912 nurses free of stroke at the cohort baseline, 1097 nurses developed stroke by the end of follow-up. At the cohort baseline, 10.3{\%} of nurses were exposed to WTN (≥1 turbine within a 6000-meter radius of the residence) and 13.3{\%} in 2013. Mean baseline residential noise levels among exposed nurses were 26.3 dB(A). No association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke incidence was found. The adjusted hazard ratios and 95{\%} CIs for the 11-, 5-, and 1-year running mean residential WTN exposures preceding stroke diagnosis, comparing nurses with residential WTN levels above and below 20 dB(A) were 1.09 (0.90-1.31), 1.08 (0.89-1.31) and 1.08 (0.89-1.32), respectively. Conclusions This comprehensive cohort study lends no support to an association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke risk.",
keywords = "Danish Nurse Cohort, environmental long‐term wind turbine exposure, epidemiology, prospective cohort study, stroke",
author = "Br{\"a}uner, {Elvira V.} and J{\o}rgensen, {Jeanette T.} and Duun-Henriksen, {Anne Katrine} and Claus Backalarz and Laursen, {Jens E.} and Pedersen, {Torben H.} and Simonsen, {Mette K.} and Andersen, {Zorana J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1161/JAHA.119.013157",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "e013157",
journal = "Journal of the American Heart Association",
issn = "2047-9980",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "14",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association Between Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise and the Risk of Stroke

T2 - Data From the Danish Nurse Cohort

AU - Bräuner, Elvira V.

AU - Jørgensen, Jeanette T.

AU - Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

AU - Backalarz, Claus

AU - Laursen, Jens E.

AU - Pedersen, Torben H.

AU - Simonsen, Mette K.

AU - Andersen, Zorana J.

PY - 2019/7/16

Y1 - 2019/7/16

N2 - Background Epidemiological studies suggest that road traffic noise increases the risk of stroke. Similar effects may be expected from wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure, but epidemiological evidence is lacking. The present study investigated the association between long-term exposure to WTN and the risk for stroke. Methods and Results First-ever stroke in 28 731 female nurses in the Danish Nurse Cohort was identified in the Danish National Patient register until the end of 2013. WTN, traffic noise, and air pollution exposures were estimated for all historic and present residential addresses between 1982 and 2013. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the associations between the 11-, 5-, and 1-year rolling means of WTN levels and stroke incidence. Of 23 912 nurses free of stroke at the cohort baseline, 1097 nurses developed stroke by the end of follow-up. At the cohort baseline, 10.3% of nurses were exposed to WTN (≥1 turbine within a 6000-meter radius of the residence) and 13.3% in 2013. Mean baseline residential noise levels among exposed nurses were 26.3 dB(A). No association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke incidence was found. The adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs for the 11-, 5-, and 1-year running mean residential WTN exposures preceding stroke diagnosis, comparing nurses with residential WTN levels above and below 20 dB(A) were 1.09 (0.90-1.31), 1.08 (0.89-1.31) and 1.08 (0.89-1.32), respectively. Conclusions This comprehensive cohort study lends no support to an association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke risk.

AB - Background Epidemiological studies suggest that road traffic noise increases the risk of stroke. Similar effects may be expected from wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure, but epidemiological evidence is lacking. The present study investigated the association between long-term exposure to WTN and the risk for stroke. Methods and Results First-ever stroke in 28 731 female nurses in the Danish Nurse Cohort was identified in the Danish National Patient register until the end of 2013. WTN, traffic noise, and air pollution exposures were estimated for all historic and present residential addresses between 1982 and 2013. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the associations between the 11-, 5-, and 1-year rolling means of WTN levels and stroke incidence. Of 23 912 nurses free of stroke at the cohort baseline, 1097 nurses developed stroke by the end of follow-up. At the cohort baseline, 10.3% of nurses were exposed to WTN (≥1 turbine within a 6000-meter radius of the residence) and 13.3% in 2013. Mean baseline residential noise levels among exposed nurses were 26.3 dB(A). No association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke incidence was found. The adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs for the 11-, 5-, and 1-year running mean residential WTN exposures preceding stroke diagnosis, comparing nurses with residential WTN levels above and below 20 dB(A) were 1.09 (0.90-1.31), 1.08 (0.89-1.31) and 1.08 (0.89-1.32), respectively. Conclusions This comprehensive cohort study lends no support to an association between long-term WTN exposure and stroke risk.

KW - Danish Nurse Cohort

KW - environmental long‐term wind turbine exposure

KW - epidemiology

KW - prospective cohort study

KW - stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069988205&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/JAHA.119.013157

DO - 10.1161/JAHA.119.013157

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - e013157

JO - Journal of the American Heart Association

JF - Journal of the American Heart Association

SN - 2047-9980

IS - 14

ER -

ID: 57757503