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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Association between alcohol, socioeconomic position and labour market participation: A prospective cohort study of transitions between work and unemployment

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DOI

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Aims: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption and problem drinking is associated with a higher risk of becoming unemployed and a lower chance of entering the job market across socioeconomic positions. Methods: A sample of 84,474 men and women aged 18-60 years from the Danish National Health Survey 2010 participated in the study. Information on alcohol consumption and problem drinking was obtained by questionnaire. The primary outcomes were becoming unemployed and entering the job market. The follow-up period was five years. Information on labour market transitions and socioeconomic position (educational level) was obtained through nationwide registers. Multiplicative analyses were performed. Results: Heavy alcohol consumption and problem drinking were associated with a higher risk of unemployment among low-educated (hazard ratio (HR)=1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-1.9) and medium-educated (HR=1.3; 95% CI 1.1-1.5) individuals in comparison to individuals with a similar educational level drinking one to seven drinks per week. Excessive alcohol consumption and problem drinking were associated with a lower chance of entering the job market for individuals with a medium or high level of education: medium-educated individuals drinking >28 drinks per week had a HR of 0.82 (95% CI 0.69-0.98) when compared to medium-educated individuals drinking one to seven drinks per week. The corresponding HR among high-educated individuals was 0.71 (95% CI 0.49-1.0). Conclusions: Heavy alcohol consumption and problem drinking are associated with a higher risk of unemployment in some social strata, whereas excessive alcohol consumption and problem drinking are associated with a lower chance of entering the job market in other social strata.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
BogserieScandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement
ISSN1403-4956
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 15 jul. 2020

ID: 60405022