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Assessment of breathing in cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial of three teaching methods among laypersons

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BACKGROUND: The aim of this trial was to compare a video- and a simulation-based teaching method to the conventional lecture-based method, hypothesizing that the video- and simulation-based teaching methods would lead to improved recognition of breathing patterns during cardiac arrest.

METHODS: In this Danish, investigator-initiated, stratified, randomised controlled trial, adult laypersons (university students, military conscripts and elderly retirees) participating in European Resuscitation Council Basic Life Support courses were randomised to receive teaching on how to recognise breathing patterns using a lecture- (usual practice), a video-, or a simulation-based teaching method. The primary outcome was recognition of breathing patterns in nine videos of actors simulating normal breathing, no breathing, and agonal breathing (three of each). We analysed outcomes using logistic regression models and present results as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P-values from likelihood ratio tests.

RESULTS: One hundred fifty-three participants were included in the analyses from February 2, 2018 through May 21, 2019 and recognition of breathing patterns was statistically significantly different between the teaching methods (P = 0.013). Compared to lecture-based teaching (83% correct answers), both video- (90% correct answers; OR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.19-2.64) and simulation-based teaching (88% correct answers; OR 1.48; 95% CI: 1.01-2.17) led to significantly more correct answers. Video-based teaching was not statistically significantly different compared to simulation-based teaching (OR 1.20; 95% CI: 0.78-1.83).

CONCLUSION: Video- and simulation-based teaching methods led to improved recognition of breathing patterns among laypersons participating in adult Basic Life Support courses compared to the conventional lecture-based teaching method.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer114
TidsskriftBMC Emergency Medicine
Vol/bind21
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)114
ISSN1471-227X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 9 okt. 2021

Bibliografisk note

© 2021. The Author(s).

ID: 68197424