Assessing the causal role of adiposity on disordered eating in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood: A Mendelian randomization analysis

Zoe E. Reed, Nadia Micali, Cynthia M. Bulik, George Davey Smith, Kaitlin H. Wade*

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde
33 Citationer (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Observational studies have shown that higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of developing disordered eating patterns. However, the causal direction of this relation remains ambiguous. Objective: We used Mendelian randomization (MR) to infer the direction of causality between BMI and disordered eating in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Design: MR analyses were conducted with a genetic score as an instrumental variable for BMI to assess the causal effect of BMI at age 7 y on disordered eating patterns at age 13 y with the use of data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4473). To examine causality in the reverse direction, MR analyses were used to estimate the effect of the same disordered eating patterns at age 13 y on BMI at age 17 y via a split-sample approach in the ALSPAC. We also investigated the causal direction of the association between BMI and eating disorders (EDs) in adults via a two-sample MR approach and publically available genome-wide association study data. Results: MR results indicated that higher BMI at age 7 y likely causes higher levels of binge eating and overeating, weight and shape concerns, and weight-control behavior patterns in both males and females and food restriction in males at age 13 y. Furthermore, results suggested that higher levels of binge eating and overeating in males at age 13 y likely cause higher BMI at age 17 y.We showed no evidence of causality between BMI and EDs in adulthood in either direction. Conclusions: This study provides evidence to suggest a causal effect of higher BMI in childhood and increased risk of disordered eating at age 13 y. Furthermore, higher levels of binge eating and overeating may cause higher BMI in later life. These results encourage an exploration of the ways to break the causal chain between these complex phenotypes, which could inform and prevent disordered eating problems in adolescence.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Vol/bind106
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)764-772
Antal sider9
ISSN0002-9165
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 sep. 2017
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Dyk ned i forskningsemnerne om 'Assessing the causal role of adiposity on disordered eating in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood: A Mendelian randomization analysis'. Sammen danner de et unikt fingeraftryk.

Citationsformater