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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Are surgeons reluctant to accurately report intraoperative adverse events? A prospective study of 1,989 patients

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  • Thomas Peponis
  • Josefine S Baekgaard
  • Jordan D Bohnen
  • Kelsey Han
  • Jarone Lee
  • Noelle Saillant
  • Peter Fagenholz
  • David R King
  • George C Velmahos
  • Haytham M A Kaafarani
Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: The true incidence of intraoperative adverse events (iAEs) remains unknown.

METHODS: All patients undergoing abdominal surgery at an academic institution between January and July 2016 were included in a prospective fashion. At the end of surgery, using a secure REDCap database, the surgeon was given the Institute of Medicine definition of intraoperative adverse events and asked whether an intraoperative adverse event had occurred. Blinded reviewers systematically examined all operative reports for intraoperative adverse events and their severity. The response rate and the intraoperative adverse event rate reported by surgeons were calculated. The latter was compared with the rate of intraoperative adverse events detected by operative report review. The severity of intraoperative adverse events was assessed based on a previously validated intraoperative adverse event classification system.

RESULTS: A total of 1,989 operations were included. The surgeons' response rate was 71.9%, reporting intraoperative adverse events in 107 operations (7.5%). Of those intraoperative adverse events, 26 (24.3%) were not described in the operative report. Operative report review revealed intraoperative adverse events in 417 operations (21.0%). Most injuries were of lower severity (85.8% were either class I or II). The surgeons' response rate was similar in operations with and without intraoperative adverse events (69.8% versus 72.5%, P=.28), but they underreported low severity intraoperative adverse events-only 13.2% of class I compared with 35.3%, 36.8%, and 55.6% of injury classes II, III, and IV respectively (P<.001).

CONCLUSION: Surgeons are willing to report intraoperative adverse events, but systematically and significantly underreport them, especially if they are of lower severity. This is potentially related to the absence of a clear intraoperative adverse event definition or their personal interpretation of their clinical significance.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSurgery
Vol/bind164
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)525-529
Antal sider5
ISSN0039-6060
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2018

ID: 56128632