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Udgivet

Are male reproductive disorders a common entity? The testicular dysgenesis syndrome

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Vis graf over relationer

Growing evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies points to a synchronized increase in the incidence of male reproductive problems, such as genital abnormalities, testicular cancer, reduced semen quality, and subfertility. Together these male reproductive problems may reflect the existence of one common entity, a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that TDS is a result of disruption of embryonal programming and gonadal development during fetal life. The recent rise in the prevalence of TDS may be causally linked to endocrine disrupters affecting genetically susceptible individuals. We recommend that future epidemiological studies on trends in male reproduction do not focus on one symptom only, but take all aspects of TDS into account. The potential impact of adverse environmental factors and the role of genetic polymorphisms involved in gonadal development requires further research.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Vol/bind948
Sider (fra-til)90-9
Antal sider10
ISSN0077-8923
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2001

ID: 51497740