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Aortic valve imaging using 18F-sodium fluoride: impact of triple motion correction

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  • Martin Lyngby Lassen
  • Evangelos Tzolos
  • Daniele Massera
  • Sebastien Cadet
  • Rong Bing
  • Jacek Kwiecinski
  • Damini Dey
  • Daniel S. Berman
  • Marc R. Dweck
  • David E. Newby
  • Piotr J. Slomka
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Background: Current 18F-NaF assessments of aortic valve microcalcification using 18F-NaF PET/CT are based on evaluations of end-diastolic or cardiac motion-corrected (ECG-MC) images, which are affected by both patient and respiratory motion. We aimed to test the impact of employing a triple motion correction technique (3 × MC), including cardiorespiratory and gross patient motion, on quantitative and qualitative measurements. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with aortic stenosis underwent two repeat 30-min PET aortic valve scans within (29 ± 24) days. We considered three different image reconstruction protocols; an end-diastolic reconstruction protocol (standard) utilizing 25% of the acquired data, an ECG-gated (four ECG gates) reconstruction (ECG-MC), and a triple motion-corrected (3 × MC) dataset which corrects for both cardiorespiratory and patient motion. All datasets were compared to aortic valve calcification scores (AVCS), using the Agatston method, obtained from CT scans using correlation plots. We report SUVmax values measured in the aortic valve and maximum target-to-background ratios (TBRmax) values after correcting for blood pool activity. Results: Compared to standard and ECG-MC reconstructions, increases in both SUVmax and TBRmax were observed following 3 × MC (SUVmax: Standard = 2.8 ± 0.7, ECG-MC = 2.6 ± 0.6, and 3 × MC = 3.3 ± 0.9; TBRmax: Standard = 2.7 ± 0.7, ECG-MC = 2.5 ± 0.6, and 3 × MC = 3.3 ± 1.2, all p values ≤ 0.05). 3 × MC had improved correlations (R2 value) to the AVCS when compared to the standard methods (SUVmax: Standard = 0.10, ECG-MC = 0.10, and 3 × MC = 0.20; TBRmax: Standard = 0.20, ECG-MC = 0.28, and 3 × MC = 0.46). Conclusion: 3 × MC improves the correlation between the AVCS and SUVmax and TBRmax and should be considered in PET studies of aortic valves using 18F-NaF.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer4
TidsskriftEJNMMI Physics
Vol/bind9
Udgave nummer1
ISSN2197-7364
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2022

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
No relevant conflict of interests relevant to this manuscript exist. This study was in part supported by Siemens.

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by Grant R01HL135557 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/National Institute of Health (NHLBI/NIH). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. In addition, the study was supported by Siemens Medical Systems. The study was also supported by a Grant (“Cardiac Imaging Research Initiative”) from the Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Medical Research Foundation. DEN is supported by the British Heart Foundation (CH/09/002, RG/16/10/32375, RE/18/5/34216) and is the recipient of a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award (WT103782AIA). MRD is supported by the Sir Jules Thorn Biomedical Research Award (JTA/15) and the British Heart Foundation (FS/14/78/31020).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

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