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Antioxidant biomarkers and cardio-metabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia: a cross-sectional study

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@article{f9a397c529604ef9baff2fe41bbf6054,
title = "Antioxidant biomarkers and cardio-metabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia: a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: High-quality diets, characterised by nutrient-rich foods, are one of the foundations for health and well-being. Indicators of diet quality, antioxidants, are associated with protection against cardiometabolic diseases. The current study explores relationships between plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk among Aboriginal people in Australia.DESIGN: As part of a community-driven health promotion programme, we conducted a cross-sectional study including a health-behaviour questionnaire, plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk markers (anthropometric, blood pressure measurements, fasting glucose, glycated Hb (HbA1c), lipids, C-reactive protein and albumin-creatinine-ratio) continuous and categorised into population-specific cut-offs. Antioxidants (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein-zeaxanthin, retinol and α-tocopherol measured using HPLC) were applied to a principal component analysis, which aggregated these into a single component. Linear regression models were applied to investigate associations between the antioxidant component and cardiometabolic risk markers.SETTING: Community in a remote area in Northern Territory, Australia.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 324 Aboriginal people, mean age 35·5 (range 15-75) years.RESULTS: Antioxidant component levels were higher among individuals with higher self-reported vegetable intake (P < 0·01), higher among individuals with higher self-reported fruit intake (P = 0·05) and lower among current smokers (P = 0·06). Linear regression revealed an inverse association between the antioxidant component and C-reactive protein (β = -0·01, P < 0·01) after adjusting for confounders.CONCLUSION: Higher plasma antioxidant levels, indicators of diet quality, were associated with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in this Aboriginal population in remote Australia. This association suggests plasma antioxidants may be protective against inflammation; however, longitudinal studies are needed to examine this potentially protective relationship.",
keywords = "cardio-metabolic risk, Indigenous people, Key words:, nutrition, Plasma antioxidants, quality of diet",
author = "Lenette Knudsen and Lyons, {Jasmine G} and Kerin O'Dea and Christensen, {Dirk L} and Brimblecombe, {Julie K}",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980020004899",
language = "English",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Antioxidant biomarkers and cardio-metabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia

T2 - a cross-sectional study

AU - Knudsen, Lenette

AU - Lyons, Jasmine G

AU - O'Dea, Kerin

AU - Christensen, Dirk L

AU - Brimblecombe, Julie K

PY - 2020/12/2

Y1 - 2020/12/2

N2 - OBJECTIVE: High-quality diets, characterised by nutrient-rich foods, are one of the foundations for health and well-being. Indicators of diet quality, antioxidants, are associated with protection against cardiometabolic diseases. The current study explores relationships between plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk among Aboriginal people in Australia.DESIGN: As part of a community-driven health promotion programme, we conducted a cross-sectional study including a health-behaviour questionnaire, plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk markers (anthropometric, blood pressure measurements, fasting glucose, glycated Hb (HbA1c), lipids, C-reactive protein and albumin-creatinine-ratio) continuous and categorised into population-specific cut-offs. Antioxidants (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein-zeaxanthin, retinol and α-tocopherol measured using HPLC) were applied to a principal component analysis, which aggregated these into a single component. Linear regression models were applied to investigate associations between the antioxidant component and cardiometabolic risk markers.SETTING: Community in a remote area in Northern Territory, Australia.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 324 Aboriginal people, mean age 35·5 (range 15-75) years.RESULTS: Antioxidant component levels were higher among individuals with higher self-reported vegetable intake (P < 0·01), higher among individuals with higher self-reported fruit intake (P = 0·05) and lower among current smokers (P = 0·06). Linear regression revealed an inverse association between the antioxidant component and C-reactive protein (β = -0·01, P < 0·01) after adjusting for confounders.CONCLUSION: Higher plasma antioxidant levels, indicators of diet quality, were associated with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in this Aboriginal population in remote Australia. This association suggests plasma antioxidants may be protective against inflammation; however, longitudinal studies are needed to examine this potentially protective relationship.

AB - OBJECTIVE: High-quality diets, characterised by nutrient-rich foods, are one of the foundations for health and well-being. Indicators of diet quality, antioxidants, are associated with protection against cardiometabolic diseases. The current study explores relationships between plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk among Aboriginal people in Australia.DESIGN: As part of a community-driven health promotion programme, we conducted a cross-sectional study including a health-behaviour questionnaire, plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk markers (anthropometric, blood pressure measurements, fasting glucose, glycated Hb (HbA1c), lipids, C-reactive protein and albumin-creatinine-ratio) continuous and categorised into population-specific cut-offs. Antioxidants (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein-zeaxanthin, retinol and α-tocopherol measured using HPLC) were applied to a principal component analysis, which aggregated these into a single component. Linear regression models were applied to investigate associations between the antioxidant component and cardiometabolic risk markers.SETTING: Community in a remote area in Northern Territory, Australia.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 324 Aboriginal people, mean age 35·5 (range 15-75) years.RESULTS: Antioxidant component levels were higher among individuals with higher self-reported vegetable intake (P < 0·01), higher among individuals with higher self-reported fruit intake (P = 0·05) and lower among current smokers (P = 0·06). Linear regression revealed an inverse association between the antioxidant component and C-reactive protein (β = -0·01, P < 0·01) after adjusting for confounders.CONCLUSION: Higher plasma antioxidant levels, indicators of diet quality, were associated with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in this Aboriginal population in remote Australia. This association suggests plasma antioxidants may be protective against inflammation; however, longitudinal studies are needed to examine this potentially protective relationship.

KW - cardio-metabolic risk

KW - Indigenous people

KW - Key words:

KW - nutrition

KW - Plasma antioxidants

KW - quality of diet

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85097281014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980020004899

DO - 10.1017/S1368980020004899

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33261694

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

ER -

ID: 61374351