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Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Antidrug Antibodies Against Biological Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  2. Population Pharmacokinetic-B Cell Modeling for Ofatumumab in Patients with Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Targeting BKCa Channels in Migraine: Rationale and Perspectives

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Extended dosing of monoclonal antibodies in multiple sclerosis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  2. Linking lesions in sensorimotor cortex to contralateral hand function in multiple sclerosis: a 7 T MRI study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. All anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies have similar efficacy and risks: No

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Increased Intrathecal Activity of Follicular Helper T Cells in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Multiple sclerosis (MS) was previously thought to be a T-cell-mediated, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying therapies targeting T cells have, indeed, shown remarkable efficacy in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. However, these therapies do also target B cells, and a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody (ocrelizumab) has recently been approved for MS therapy and is efficacious not only in relapsing forms of MS but also in some patients with primary progressive MS. This suggests that B cells may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of MS than previously appreciated. We review the potential roles of B cells, which are the precursors of antibody-secreting plasma cells in the pathogenesis of MS. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the characteristics and clinical data for the four monoclonal antibodies (ocrelizumab, ofatumumab, rituximab, and ublituximab) that have been approved, are currently been used off-label or are being investigated as treatments for MS. These antibodies all target the cluster of differentiation (CD)-20 molecule and bind to distinct or overlapping epitopes on B cells and a subset of T cells that express CD20. This leads to B-cell depletion and, possibly, to depletion of CD20-positive T cells. The net result is strong suppression of clinical and radiological disease activity as well as slowing of the development of persisting neurological impairment.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCNS Drugs
Vol/bind34
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)269-280
Antal sider12
ISSN1172-7047
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2020

ID: 61519696