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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. CO-HEP; Copenhagen Hepatitis C Program

    Projekt: Typer af projekter

  1. Cancer Risk in Pediatric-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Population-Based Danish Cohort Study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Antibody Responses to Immunization With HCV Envelope Glycoproteins as a Baseline for B cell-Based Vaccine Development

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Crohn's Disease With Progressive Renal Impairment

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKommentar/debatForskningpeer review

  4. Safety of Proton Pump Inhibitors Based on a Large, Multi-year, Randomized Trial of Patients Receiving Rivaroxaban or Aspirin

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Remission of bile acid malabsorption symptoms following treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Development of a downstream process for the production of an inactivated whole hepatitis C virus vaccine

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Global and local envelope protein dynamics of hepatitis C virus determine broad antibody sensitivity

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. An alternate conformation of HCV E2 neutralizing face as an additional vaccine target

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver-related death in more than 300,000 people annually. Treatments for patients with chronic HCV are suboptimal, despite the introduction of directly acting antiviral agents. There is no vaccine that prevents HCV infection. Relevant animal models are important for HCV research and development of drugs and vaccines. Chimpanzees are the best model for studies of HCV infection and related innate and adaptive host immune responses. They can be used in immunogenicity and efficacy studies of HCV vaccines. The only small animal models of robust HCV infection are T- and B- cell deficient mice with human chimeric livers. Although these mice cannot be used in studies of adaptive immunity, they have provided new insights into HCV neutralization, interactions between virus and receptors, innate host responses, and therapeutic approaches. Recent progress in developing genetically humanized mice is exciting, but these models only permit studies of specific steps in the HCV life cycle and have limited or no viral replication.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftGastroenterology
Vol/bind142
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1279-1287.e3
ISSN0016-5085
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

ID: 36472000