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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Adherence to early pulmonary rehabilitation after COPD exacerbation and risk of hospital readmission: a secondary analysis of the COPD-EXA-REHAB study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer
Background Early pulmonary rehabilitation after exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has previously been shown to reduce the risk of hospital admission and improve physical performance and quality of life. However, the impact of attendance at early rehabilitation programmes has not been established.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBMJ Open Respiratory Research
Vol/bind7
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)1-6
Antal sider6
ISSN2052-4439
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 19 aug. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

ID: 61962269