Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

ABO blood types and sepsis mortality

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Incidence and impact of parvovirus B19 infection in seronegative solid organ transplant recipients

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Lynch syndrome-associated epithelial ovarian cancer and its immunological profile

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Response to Aviv et al

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine if the ABO blood types carry different risks of 30-day mortality, acute kidney injury (AKI), and endothelial damage in critically ill patients with sepsis. This was a retrospective cohort study of three independent cohorts of critically ill patients from the United States and Scandinavia consisting of adults with septic shock. We compared the 30-day mortality across the blood types within each cohort and pooled the results in a meta-analysis. We also estimated the incidence of AKI and degree of endothelial damage, as measured by blood concentrations of soluble thrombomodulin and syndecan-1.

RESULTS: We included 12,342 patients with severe sepsis. In a pooled analysis blood type B carried a slightly lower risk of 30-day all-cause mortality compared to non-blood type B (adjusted HR 0.88; 95%-CI 0.79-0.98; p = 0.02). There was no difference in the risk of AKI. Soluble thrombomodulin and syndecan-1 concentrations were lower in patients with blood type B and O compared to blood type A, suggesting less endothelial damage.

CONCLUSION: Septic patients with blood type B had less endothelial damage, and a small reduction in mortality. The exposure is, however, unmodifiable.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer61
TidsskriftAnnals of Intensive Care
Vol/bind11
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)61
ISSN2110-5820
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 20 apr. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
The study was supported by the Danish National Research Foundation [grant number 126] (CHIP & PERSIMUNE), The Lundbeck Foundation, Research Foundation for the Capital Region of Denmark (A6052).

ID: 65076780