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A recovery program to improve quality of life, sense of coherence and psychological health in ICU survivors: a multicenter randomized controlled trial, the RAPIT study

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@article{31a7087a71cf42e5b97398b6d455e7af,
title = "A recovery program to improve quality of life, sense of coherence and psychological health in ICU survivors: a multicenter randomized controlled trial, the RAPIT study",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to test the effectiveness of a post-ICU recovery program compared to standard care during the first year after ICU discharge.METHODS: A pragmatic, non-blinded, multicenter, parallel-group RCT was conducted between December 2012 and December 2015, at ten intensive care units (ICUs) in Denmark. We randomly assigned 386 adult patients (≥18 years) after receiving mechanical ventilation (≥48 h) to standard care (SC) plus a nurse-led intensive care recovery program or standard care alone after ICU discharge (190 intervention, 196 SC). Primary outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQOL) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were sense of coherence (SOC), anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed at 3 and 12 months after ICU discharge including utilization of healthcare services at 12 months.RESULTS: At 12 months, we found no differences in HRQOL between groups (mean difference in the Physical Component Summary score, 1.41 [95 {\%} CI, -1.53 to 4.35; p = 0.35] (n = 235); and in the Mental Component Summary score, 1.92 [95 {\%} CI, -1.06 to 4.90; p = 0.11] (n = 235). No differences were found on self-reported SOC (p = 0.63), anxiety (p = 0.68), depression (p = 0.67), PTSD (p = 0.27), or the utilization of healthcare services including rehabilitation. We found a difference on anxiety, when a cut-off point ≥11 was applied, in per protocol analysis of complete cases at 3 months favoring the intervention (8.8 {\%} vs. 16.2 {\%}, p = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: The tested recovery program was not superior to standard care during the first 12 months post-ICU.TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, identification no. NCT01721239.",
author = "{Froulund Jensen}, Janet and Ingrid Egerod and Bestle, {Morten H} and Christensen, {Doris F} and Ask Elklit and Hansen, {Randi Lykke} and Heidi Knudsen and Grode, {Louise B} and Dorthe Overgaard",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1007/s00134-016-4522-1",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "1733--1743",
journal = "Intensive Care Medicine",
issn = "0342-4642",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A recovery program to improve quality of life, sense of coherence and psychological health in ICU survivors

T2 - a multicenter randomized controlled trial, the RAPIT study

AU - Froulund Jensen, Janet

AU - Egerod, Ingrid

AU - Bestle, Morten H

AU - Christensen, Doris F

AU - Elklit, Ask

AU - Hansen, Randi Lykke

AU - Knudsen, Heidi

AU - Grode, Louise B

AU - Overgaard, Dorthe

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to test the effectiveness of a post-ICU recovery program compared to standard care during the first year after ICU discharge.METHODS: A pragmatic, non-blinded, multicenter, parallel-group RCT was conducted between December 2012 and December 2015, at ten intensive care units (ICUs) in Denmark. We randomly assigned 386 adult patients (≥18 years) after receiving mechanical ventilation (≥48 h) to standard care (SC) plus a nurse-led intensive care recovery program or standard care alone after ICU discharge (190 intervention, 196 SC). Primary outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQOL) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were sense of coherence (SOC), anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed at 3 and 12 months after ICU discharge including utilization of healthcare services at 12 months.RESULTS: At 12 months, we found no differences in HRQOL between groups (mean difference in the Physical Component Summary score, 1.41 [95 % CI, -1.53 to 4.35; p = 0.35] (n = 235); and in the Mental Component Summary score, 1.92 [95 % CI, -1.06 to 4.90; p = 0.11] (n = 235). No differences were found on self-reported SOC (p = 0.63), anxiety (p = 0.68), depression (p = 0.67), PTSD (p = 0.27), or the utilization of healthcare services including rehabilitation. We found a difference on anxiety, when a cut-off point ≥11 was applied, in per protocol analysis of complete cases at 3 months favoring the intervention (8.8 % vs. 16.2 %, p = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: The tested recovery program was not superior to standard care during the first 12 months post-ICU.TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, identification no. NCT01721239.

AB - PURPOSE: The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to test the effectiveness of a post-ICU recovery program compared to standard care during the first year after ICU discharge.METHODS: A pragmatic, non-blinded, multicenter, parallel-group RCT was conducted between December 2012 and December 2015, at ten intensive care units (ICUs) in Denmark. We randomly assigned 386 adult patients (≥18 years) after receiving mechanical ventilation (≥48 h) to standard care (SC) plus a nurse-led intensive care recovery program or standard care alone after ICU discharge (190 intervention, 196 SC). Primary outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQOL) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were sense of coherence (SOC), anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed at 3 and 12 months after ICU discharge including utilization of healthcare services at 12 months.RESULTS: At 12 months, we found no differences in HRQOL between groups (mean difference in the Physical Component Summary score, 1.41 [95 % CI, -1.53 to 4.35; p = 0.35] (n = 235); and in the Mental Component Summary score, 1.92 [95 % CI, -1.06 to 4.90; p = 0.11] (n = 235). No differences were found on self-reported SOC (p = 0.63), anxiety (p = 0.68), depression (p = 0.67), PTSD (p = 0.27), or the utilization of healthcare services including rehabilitation. We found a difference on anxiety, when a cut-off point ≥11 was applied, in per protocol analysis of complete cases at 3 months favoring the intervention (8.8 % vs. 16.2 %, p = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: The tested recovery program was not superior to standard care during the first 12 months post-ICU.TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, identification no. NCT01721239.

U2 - 10.1007/s00134-016-4522-1

DO - 10.1007/s00134-016-4522-1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 42

SP - 1733

EP - 1743

JO - Intensive Care Medicine

JF - Intensive Care Medicine

SN - 0342-4642

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 49190477