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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital

SCIP-NORM

Projekt: Typer af projekterProjekt

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Intro:
Age-based norms for the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry – Danish version (SCIP-D) (2018-2020). We have validated the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry – Danish version (SCIP-D) for assessment of objective cognitive impairment in BD. However, no age-based norms are currently established for the SCIP-D. Furthermore, repeated testing is often employed when assessing the effect of cognition treatments. However, repeated testing is associated with practice effects, and it remains to be determined what constitutes a reliable change on neuropsychological test scores. This study therefore aimed to (i) establish demographically adjusted norms for the SCIP-D and demographically adjusted normative change on the SCIP and (ii) examine whether the normative change over 1-2 years is significantly different between patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

Metoder:
Observational study. 2 assessments 1 year apart with a cognition screening tool and neuropsychological tests and clinical ratings.

Resultater (forventede):
The resulting paper has been accepted for publication:
Caroline V Ott 1, Ulla Knorr 1, Andreas Jespersen 1, Kia Obenhausen 1, Isabella Røen 1, Scot E Purdon 2, Lars V Kessing 3, Kamilla W Miskowiak 4Norms for the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry and cognitive trajectories in bipolar disorder. J Affect Disord 2020 Dec 1;281:33-40.
doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.11.119.

Diskussion/Impact (forventet):
We recommend implementing demographically adjusted norms and change norms for the SCIP in clinical and research settings. Change norms seem sensitive to subtle and selective cognitive decline over one year in remitted BD.
StatusAfsluttet
Periode01/01/201801/01/2021

    Forskningsområder

  • Sundhedsvidenskab - Mood Disorders, Psychological assessment and psychometrics, cognition, Observational study

ID: 61736699