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Triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: a study of 125 727 individuals

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@article{f04a5e0d880243c5a1c10902333dd79f,
title = "Triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: a study of 125 727 individuals",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease such as smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, and diabetes have also been associated with risk of dementia. Whether hypertriglyceridemia represents a shared risk factor as well remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke.METHODS: Using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we examined the association between increased plasma triglycerides and risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke with Cox regression.RESULTS: On a continuous scale, higher concentrations of plasma triglycerides were associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, but not with Alzheimer disease. In age, sex, and cohort adjusted models, the highest percentile of triglycerides (median 629 mg/dL; 7.1 mmol/L) versus the 1-50th percentiles (median 89 mg/dL; 1.0 mmol/L) was associated with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.63) for non-Alzheimer dementia, 1.18 (0.73-1.91) for Alzheimer disease, and of 1.89 (1.50-2.38) for ischemic stroke. Corresponding hazard ratios were 1.62 (1.08-2.44), 1.25 (0.77-2.02), and 1.57 (1.24-1.98) in models adjusted multifactorially, and 1.79 (1.16-2.87), 1.18 (0.73-1.92), and 1.46 (1.10-1.95) in models adjusted multifactorially and additionally for apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, respectively. Results were similar after excluding individuals who had an event within 2 years after study entry.CONCLUSIONS: Moderate hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increased risk of both non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, highlighting plasma triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.",
author = "Nordestgaard, {Liv T} and Mette Christoffersen and Shoaib Afzal and Nordestgaard, {B{\o}rge G} and Anne Tybj{\ae}rg-Hansen and Ruth Frikke-Schmidt",
note = "{\textcopyright} American Association for Clinical Chemistry 2021. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1093/clinchem/hvaa269",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "245--255",
journal = "Clinical Chemistry",
issn = "0009-9147",
publisher = "American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

T2 - a study of 125 727 individuals

AU - Nordestgaard, Liv T

AU - Christoffersen, Mette

AU - Afzal, Shoaib

AU - Nordestgaard, Børge G

AU - Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

AU - Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

N1 - © American Association for Clinical Chemistry 2021. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2021/1/8

Y1 - 2021/1/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: Risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease such as smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, and diabetes have also been associated with risk of dementia. Whether hypertriglyceridemia represents a shared risk factor as well remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke.METHODS: Using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we examined the association between increased plasma triglycerides and risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke with Cox regression.RESULTS: On a continuous scale, higher concentrations of plasma triglycerides were associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, but not with Alzheimer disease. In age, sex, and cohort adjusted models, the highest percentile of triglycerides (median 629 mg/dL; 7.1 mmol/L) versus the 1-50th percentiles (median 89 mg/dL; 1.0 mmol/L) was associated with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.63) for non-Alzheimer dementia, 1.18 (0.73-1.91) for Alzheimer disease, and of 1.89 (1.50-2.38) for ischemic stroke. Corresponding hazard ratios were 1.62 (1.08-2.44), 1.25 (0.77-2.02), and 1.57 (1.24-1.98) in models adjusted multifactorially, and 1.79 (1.16-2.87), 1.18 (0.73-1.92), and 1.46 (1.10-1.95) in models adjusted multifactorially and additionally for apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, respectively. Results were similar after excluding individuals who had an event within 2 years after study entry.CONCLUSIONS: Moderate hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increased risk of both non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, highlighting plasma triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

AB - BACKGROUND: Risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease such as smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, and diabetes have also been associated with risk of dementia. Whether hypertriglyceridemia represents a shared risk factor as well remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke.METHODS: Using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we examined the association between increased plasma triglycerides and risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke with Cox regression.RESULTS: On a continuous scale, higher concentrations of plasma triglycerides were associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, but not with Alzheimer disease. In age, sex, and cohort adjusted models, the highest percentile of triglycerides (median 629 mg/dL; 7.1 mmol/L) versus the 1-50th percentiles (median 89 mg/dL; 1.0 mmol/L) was associated with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.63) for non-Alzheimer dementia, 1.18 (0.73-1.91) for Alzheimer disease, and of 1.89 (1.50-2.38) for ischemic stroke. Corresponding hazard ratios were 1.62 (1.08-2.44), 1.25 (0.77-2.02), and 1.57 (1.24-1.98) in models adjusted multifactorially, and 1.79 (1.16-2.87), 1.18 (0.73-1.92), and 1.46 (1.10-1.95) in models adjusted multifactorially and additionally for apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, respectively. Results were similar after excluding individuals who had an event within 2 years after study entry.CONCLUSIONS: Moderate hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increased risk of both non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, highlighting plasma triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

U2 - 10.1093/clinchem/hvaa269

DO - 10.1093/clinchem/hvaa269

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33418579

VL - 67

SP - 245

EP - 255

JO - Clinical Chemistry

JF - Clinical Chemistry

SN - 0009-9147

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 61718073