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Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The effect of energy-protein supplementation on weight, body composition and handgrip strength among pulmonary tuberculosis HIV-co-infected patients: randomised controlled trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

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  • George PrayGod
  • Nyagosya Range
  • Daniel Faurholt-Jepsen
  • Kidola Jeremiah
  • Maria Faurholt-Jepsen
  • Martine G Aabye
  • Lotte Jensen
  • Andreas V Jensen
  • Harleen M S Grewal
  • Pascal Magnussen
  • John Changalucha
  • Aase Bengaard Andersen
  • Henrik Friis
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Undernutrition is common among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB+) patients. Micronutrient supplementation may improve treatment outcomes, but it is unclear whether additional energy-protein would be beneficial. The present study aimed to assess the effect of energy-protein supplementation on weight, body composition and handgrip strength against a background of high micronutrient intake during tuberculosis (TB) treatment. A total of 377 PTB+ patients co-infected with HIV were randomly allocated one or six biscuits daily for 60 d during TB treatment. Weight, arm fat area, arm muscle area and handgrip strength were assessed at baseline and 2 and 5 months. There were no effects on any outcome at 2 months, but energy-protein supplementation was associated with a 1·3 (95 % CI - 0·1, 2·8) kg marginally significant gain in handgrip strength at 5 months. However, after 2 months, energy-protein supplementation led to a weight gain of 1·9 (95 % CI 0·1, 3·7) kg among patients with cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counts ≥ 350 cells/μl, but not among patients with low CD4 counts ( - 0·2 kg; 95 % CI - 1·3, 0·8, Pinteraction = 0·03). Similarly, at 5 months, energy-protein supplementation led to a 2·3 (95 % CI 0·6, 4·1) kg higher handgrip strength gain among patients with CD4 counts < 350 cells/μl, but not in those with high CD4 counts (Pinteraction = 0·04). In conclusion, energy-protein supplementation to PTB+ HIV-co-infected patients had no overall effects on weight and body composition, but was associated with marginally significant gain in handgrip strength. More research is needed to develop an effective supplement, before it is recommended to TB programmes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe British journal of nutrition
Volume107
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)263-71
Number of pages9
ISSN0007-1145
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

    Research areas

  • Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Body Composition, Body Weight, Dietary Proteins, Energy Intake, Female, Food, Formulated, HIV Infections, Hand Strength, Humans, Male, Malnutrition, Middle Aged, Patient Dropouts, Tanzania, Tuberculosis, Pulmonary, Young Adult, Journal Article, Multicenter Study, Randomized Controlled Trial, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 51559085