Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Short-term blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO)

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Prevalence, Treatment, and Control Rates of Conventional and Ambulatory Hypertension Across 10 Populations in 3 Continents

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Relationship Between Two Common Lipoprotein Lipase Variants and the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Individual Components

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The Cardiovascular Risk of White-Coat Hypertension

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. High osteoprotegerin is associated with development of foot ulcer in type 1 diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Prognosis in relation to blood pressure variability: con side of the argument

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Katarzyna Stolarz-Skrzypek
  • Lutgarde Thijs
  • Yan Li
  • Tine W. Hansen
  • José Boggia
  • Tatiana Kuznetsova
  • Masahiro Kikuya
  • Gladys Maestre
  • Luis Mena
  • Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz
  • Jan A. Staessen
View graph of relations

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring not only provides information on the blood pressure level, but on the diurnal changes in blood pressure as well. The present review summarizes the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk stratification based on short-term blood pressure variability. An exaggerated morning surge, exceeding the 90 th percentile of the population, is an independent risk factor for mortality and cardiovascular and cardiac events. Conversely, a sleep-through or pre-awakening morning surge less than 20 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure is probably not associated with an increased risk of death or cardiovascular events. Blood pressure variability represented by the average of the daytime and nighttime SD weighted for the duration of the daytime and nighttime interval (SD dn) and by average real variability (ARV24) predicted outcome, but only improved the prediction of the composite cardiovascular events by 0.1%. Overall, results of analyses using the IDACO support the concept that short-term blood pressure variability adds to risk stratification, but 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure level is the most valuable predictor for use in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Cardiologica
Volume66
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)701-706
Number of pages6
ISSN0001-5385
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Dec 2011

    Research areas

  • Blood pressure, Blood pressure variability, Cardiovascular outcome, Morning surge

ID: 55110783