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Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Resistance training in the early postoperative phase reduces hospitalization and leads to muscle hypertrophy in elderly hip surgery patients--a controlled, randomized study

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OBJECTIVES: To better understand how immobilization and surgery affect muscle size and function in the elderly and to identify effective training regimes.

DESIGN: A prospective randomized, controlled study.

SETTING: Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-six patients (aged 60-86) scheduled for unilateral hip replacement due to primary hip osteoarthrosis.

INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized to standard home-based rehabilitation (1 h/d x 12 weeks), unilateral neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the operated side (1 h/d x 12 weeks), or unilateral resistance training of the operated side (3/wk x 12 weeks).

MEASUREMENTS: Hospital length of stay (LOS), quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), isokinetic muscle strength, and functional performance. Patients were tested presurgery and 5 and 12 weeks postsurgery.

RESULTS: Mean+/-standard error LOS was shorter for the resistance training group (10.0+/-2.4 days, P<.05) than for the standard rehabilitation group (16.0+/-7.2 days). Resistance training, but not electrical stimulation or standard rehabilitation, resulted in increased CSA (12%, P<.05) and muscle strength (22-28%, P<.05). Functional muscle performance increased after resistance training (30%, P<.001) and electrical stimulation (15%, P<.05) but not after standard rehabilitation.

CONCLUSION: Postoperative resistance training effectively increased maximal muscle strength, muscle mass, and muscle function more than a standard rehabilitation regime. Furthermore, it markedly reduced LOS in elderly postoperative patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume52
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)2016-22
Number of pages7
ISSN0002-8614
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

    Research areas

  • Activities of Daily Living, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip, Electric Stimulation Therapy, Exercise Therapy, Female, Humans, Immobilization, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Muscular Atrophy, Postoperative Care, Prospective Studies, Statistics, Nonparametric

ID: 44826860