Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Mechanical properties of human patellar tendon collagen fibrils. An exploratory study of aging and sex

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Altered Triceps Surae Muscle–Tendon Unit Properties after Six Months of Static Stretching

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effects of genipin crosslinking on mechanical cell-matrix interaction in 3D engineered tendon constructs

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Collagen Growth Pattern in Human Articular Cartilage of the Knee

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. A systematic review of imaging findings in patients with Osgood-Schlatter disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Different training responses in elderly men and women following a prolonged muscle resistance training intervention

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Musculoskeletal sports medicine injuries in Special Operations Forces soldiers

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  5. Mutual stimulatory signaling between human myogenic cells and rat cerebellar neurons

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Tendons are connective tissues that transmit mechanical forces from muscle to bone and consist mainly of nano-scale fibrils of type I collagen. Aging has been associated with reduced mechanical function of tendons at the whole-tendon level and also with increased glycation of tendon collagen fibrils. Yet, the mechanical effects of aging at the fibril level remain unknown. In vitro glycation has previously been reported to substantially increase fibril strength and stiffness in young rats, suggesting a potentially large effect of aging through the glycation mechanism. We therefore expected that aging would have a similar major impact on fibril mechanical properties. In addition, differences in fibril mechanical properties between men and women have never been studied. This study investigated human patellar tendon biopsies from young (26 ± 4 years) and elderly (66 ± 1 years), men and women by measuring the mechanical properties of individual collagen fibrils using a custom nano-mechanical device. There were no major mechanical differences with either age or sex, but there were modestly greater failure stress (22%) and tensile modulus at both low and high strain (16% and 26% respectively) in the elderly group. No significant differences in mechanical properties were observed between men and women. The slightly greater strength and stiffness in the elderly group are in contrasts to the age-related deficits observed for whole-tendons in vivo, although the study was not designed to investigate these minor differences.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104864
JournalJournal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials
Volume124
Pages (from-to)104864
ISSN1878-0180
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • Aged, Aging, Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Collagen, Humans, Patellar Ligament, Rats, Tendons

ID: 70127421