Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Low vitamin D in dark-skinned immigrants is mainly due to clothing habits and low UVR exposure: a Danish observational study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  1. Few X-ray and PUVA treatments accelerate photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  2. Personal electronic UVR dosimeter measurements: specific and general uncertainties

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  3. Adult UVR exposure changes with life stage - a 14-year follow-up study using personal electronic UVR dosimeters

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  4. Pigment genes not skin pigmentation affect UVB-induced vitamin D

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  1. Distribution of protoporphyrin IX in erythrocytes in a case of acquired erythropoietic protoporphyria

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  2. A revised action spectrum for vitamin D synthesis by suberythemal UV radiation exposure in humans in vivo

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  3. Few X-ray and PUVA treatments accelerate photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  4. Hvilke aktiniske keratoser bliver til planocellulære carcinomer?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

View graph of relations

Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D) among dark-pigmented persons has been observed. To elucidate the reason for this we examined sun behaviour, sun-exposed body area, solar UVR exposure and 25(OH)D levels in immigrants with dark pigmented skin and Danes with light pigmented skin. Clothing, sun behaviour, and diet were recorded daily during a Danish summer season (93 analysed days). Erythema-weighted UVR doses were measured by personal electronic UVR dosimeters (with erythema response, measurement every 5th second) and 25(OH)D was measured in 72 participants (33 dark-skinned and 39 light-skinned). The immigrants exposed 28% less skin area, received 70% less UVR dose, and had 71% less 25(OH)D increase during the summer. The UVR reactivity (Δ25(OH)D per joule accumulated UVR dose) was similar (P = 0.62) among the immigrants (0.53 nmol l-1 J-1) and the Danes (0.63 nmol l-1 J-1). In the groups combined, 25(OH)D levels after summer were mainly influenced by UVR dose to exposed skin (28.8%) and 25(OH)D start level (27.9%). Height and measured constitutive skin pigmentation were of minor influence: 3.5% and 3.2%, respectively. Sun exposure and clothing habits were the main reasons for lower 25(OH)D level after summer in the darker immigrants, as both groups had similar UVR reactivity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhotochemical & photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
Volume20
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)1573-1584
Number of pages12
ISSN1474-905X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

© 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to European Photochemistry Association, European Society for Photobiology.

ID: 70625584