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Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Low physical activity and higher use of screen devices are associated with myopia at the age of 16-17 years in the CCC2000 Eye Study

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DOI

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  • Mathias Hvidtfelt Hansen
  • Poul Pedersen Laigaard
  • Else Marie Olsen
  • Anne Mette Skovgaard
  • Michael Larsen
  • Line Kessel
  • Inger Christine Munch
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PURPOSE: To determine the myopia prevalence in a Danish cohort aged 16-17 years and its relation to physical activity and use of screen-based electronic devices.

METHODS: The Copenhagen Child Cohort 2000 Eye Study is a prospective, population-based, observational study. Information about use of screen devices and physical activity was obtained using questionnaires. Myopia was defined as non-cycloplegic subjective spherical equivalent refraction ≤-0.50 D in right eye.

RESULTS: We included 1443 participants (45% boys) with a median age (±IQR) of 16.6 years (±0.3). The prevalence of myopia was 25% (CI95% 23-28, n = 360) with no differences between sexes (p = 0.10). The odds ratio (OR) for myopia was 0.57 (CI95% 0.42-0.76, p = 0.0002) in participants physically active 3-6 hr/week (n = 502) and 0.56 (CI95% 0.42-0.76, p = 0.0002) if active >6 hr/week (n = 506), both compared with participants physically active <3 hr/week (n = 396). The use of screen devices >6 hr/day was associated with increased OR for myopia compared with screen device use <2 hr/day in both weekdays (OR = 1.95, CI95% 1.16-3.30, p = 0.012) and weekends (OR = 2.10, CI95% 1.17-3.77, p = 0.013).

CONCLUSION: In this cohort of healthy 16-17-year olds, lower physical activity and more use of screen devices contributed significantly to the observed 25% prevalence of myopia with a roughly doubled risk of having myopia if physically active <3 hr/week or if using screen devices >6 hr/day. Our results support physical activity being a protective factor and near work a risk factor for myopia in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Ophthalmologica
Volume98
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)315-321
Number of pages7
ISSN1755-375X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2020

    Research areas

  • adolescents, cohort study, exercise, mobile devices, myopia prevalence, near-sightedness, physical activity, smartphones, tablets

ID: 58260376