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Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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Harvard

Linderoth, G, Rosenkrantz, O, Lippert, F, Østergaard, D, Ersbøll, AK, Meyhoff, CS, Folke, F & Christensen, HC 2021, 'Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation', Resuscitation, vol. 168, pp. 35-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048

APA

Linderoth, G., Rosenkrantz, O., Lippert, F., Østergaard, D., Ersbøll, A. K., Meyhoff, C. S., Folke, F., & Christensen, H. C. (2021). Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Resuscitation, 168, 35-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048

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MLA

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Author

Linderoth, Gitte ; Rosenkrantz, Oscar ; Lippert, Freddy ; Østergaard, Doris ; Ersbøll, Annette K ; Meyhoff, Christian S ; Folke, Fredrik ; Christensen, Helle C. / Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In: Resuscitation. 2021 ; Vol. 168. pp. 35-43.

Bibtex

@article{2fd9933c9eaa4b98b88630ae469a43fc,
title = "Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation",
abstract = "AIM: To investigate whether live video streaming from the bystander's smartphone to a medical dispatcher can improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).METHODS: After CPR was initiated, live video was added to the communication by the medical dispatcher using smartphone technology. From the video recordings, we subjectively evaluated changes in CPR quality after themedical dispatcher had used live video to dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR). CPR quality was registered for each bystander and compared with CPR quality after video-instructed DA-CPR. Data were analysed using logistic regression adjusted for bystander's relation to the patient and whether the arrest was witnessed.RESULTS: CPR was provided with live video streaming in 52 OHCA calls, with 90 bystanders who performed chest compressions. Hand position was incorrect for 38 bystanders (42.2%) and improved for 23 bystanders (60.5%) after video-instructed DA-CPR. The compression rate was incorrect for 36 bystanders (40.0%) and improved for 27 bystanders (75.0%). Compression depth was incorrect for 57 bystanders (63.3%) and improved for 33 bystanders (57.9%). The adjusted odds ratios for improved CPR after video-instructed DA-CPR were; hand position 5.8 (95% CI: 2.8-12.1), compression rate 7.7 (95% CI: 3.4-17.3), and compression depth 7.1 (95% CI: 3.9-12.9). Hands-off time was reduced for 34 (37.8%) bystanders.CONCLUSIONS: Live video streaming from the scene of a cardiac arrest to medical dispatchers is feasible. It allowed an opportunity for dispatchers to coach those providing CPR which was associated with a subjectively evaluated improvement in CPR performance.",
keywords = "Cardiac arrest, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Dispatcher, Emergency call, Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, Technology, Video",
author = "Gitte Linderoth and Oscar Rosenkrantz and Freddy Lippert and Doris {\O}stergaard and Ersb{\o}ll, {Annette K} and Meyhoff, {Christian S} and Fredrik Folke and Christensen, {Helle C}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048",
language = "English",
volume = "168",
pages = "35--43",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation

AU - Linderoth, Gitte

AU - Rosenkrantz, Oscar

AU - Lippert, Freddy

AU - Østergaard, Doris

AU - Ersbøll, Annette K

AU - Meyhoff, Christian S

AU - Folke, Fredrik

AU - Christensen, Helle C

N1 - Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/9/9

Y1 - 2021/9/9

N2 - AIM: To investigate whether live video streaming from the bystander's smartphone to a medical dispatcher can improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).METHODS: After CPR was initiated, live video was added to the communication by the medical dispatcher using smartphone technology. From the video recordings, we subjectively evaluated changes in CPR quality after themedical dispatcher had used live video to dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR). CPR quality was registered for each bystander and compared with CPR quality after video-instructed DA-CPR. Data were analysed using logistic regression adjusted for bystander's relation to the patient and whether the arrest was witnessed.RESULTS: CPR was provided with live video streaming in 52 OHCA calls, with 90 bystanders who performed chest compressions. Hand position was incorrect for 38 bystanders (42.2%) and improved for 23 bystanders (60.5%) after video-instructed DA-CPR. The compression rate was incorrect for 36 bystanders (40.0%) and improved for 27 bystanders (75.0%). Compression depth was incorrect for 57 bystanders (63.3%) and improved for 33 bystanders (57.9%). The adjusted odds ratios for improved CPR after video-instructed DA-CPR were; hand position 5.8 (95% CI: 2.8-12.1), compression rate 7.7 (95% CI: 3.4-17.3), and compression depth 7.1 (95% CI: 3.9-12.9). Hands-off time was reduced for 34 (37.8%) bystanders.CONCLUSIONS: Live video streaming from the scene of a cardiac arrest to medical dispatchers is feasible. It allowed an opportunity for dispatchers to coach those providing CPR which was associated with a subjectively evaluated improvement in CPR performance.

AB - AIM: To investigate whether live video streaming from the bystander's smartphone to a medical dispatcher can improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).METHODS: After CPR was initiated, live video was added to the communication by the medical dispatcher using smartphone technology. From the video recordings, we subjectively evaluated changes in CPR quality after themedical dispatcher had used live video to dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR). CPR quality was registered for each bystander and compared with CPR quality after video-instructed DA-CPR. Data were analysed using logistic regression adjusted for bystander's relation to the patient and whether the arrest was witnessed.RESULTS: CPR was provided with live video streaming in 52 OHCA calls, with 90 bystanders who performed chest compressions. Hand position was incorrect for 38 bystanders (42.2%) and improved for 23 bystanders (60.5%) after video-instructed DA-CPR. The compression rate was incorrect for 36 bystanders (40.0%) and improved for 27 bystanders (75.0%). Compression depth was incorrect for 57 bystanders (63.3%) and improved for 33 bystanders (57.9%). The adjusted odds ratios for improved CPR after video-instructed DA-CPR were; hand position 5.8 (95% CI: 2.8-12.1), compression rate 7.7 (95% CI: 3.4-17.3), and compression depth 7.1 (95% CI: 3.9-12.9). Hands-off time was reduced for 34 (37.8%) bystanders.CONCLUSIONS: Live video streaming from the scene of a cardiac arrest to medical dispatchers is feasible. It allowed an opportunity for dispatchers to coach those providing CPR which was associated with a subjectively evaluated improvement in CPR performance.

KW - Cardiac arrest

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - Dispatcher

KW - Emergency call

KW - Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

KW - Technology

KW - Video

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85115609628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34509558

VL - 168

SP - 35

EP - 43

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -

ID: 67846444