Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and cardiovascular disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Serum proatrial natriuretic peptide concentrations during oral glucose-induced acute hyperinsulinemia in lean and obese men

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Cardiac procholecystokinin expression during haemodynamic changes in the mammalian heart

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor antagonists as anti-diabetic agents

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Wavy multistratified amacrine cells in the monkey retina contain immunoreactive secretoneurin

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. The Effects of Dual GLP-1/GIP Receptor Agonism on Glucagon Secretion - A Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Separate and Combined Effects of GIP and GLP-1 Infusions on Bone Metabolism in Overweight Men without Diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Long term treatment with stimulant laxatives - clinical evidence for effectiveness and safety?

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  • Sebastian M Heimbürger
  • Natasha C Bergmann
  • Robert Augustin
  • Lærke S Gasbjerg
  • Mikkel B Christensen
  • Filip K Knop
View graph of relations

Accumulating evidence suggests that glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in addition to its involvement in type 2 diabetic pathophysiology may be involved in the development of obesity and the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we outline recent preclinical and clinical cardiovascular-related discoveries about GIP. These include chronotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects of GIP. Furthermore, GIP has been suggested to control vasodilation via secretion of nitric oxide, and vascular leukocyte adhesion and inflammation via expression and secretion of endothelin 1. Also, GIP seems to regulate circulating lipids via effects on adipose tissue uptake and metabolism of lipids. Lastly, we discuss how dysmetabolic conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes may shift the actions of GIP in an atherogenic direction, and we provide a perspective on the therapeutic potential of GIP receptor agonism and antagonism in cardiovascular diseases. We conclude that GIP actions may have implications for the development of cardiovascular disease, but also that the potential of GIP-based drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease currently is uncertain.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPeptides
ISSN0196-9781
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Nov 2019

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

ID: 58311047